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We LUPEC ladies are all about a good time and cocktailing for a cause. We’re also keen on culture, which is why you’re sure to find us this Sunday raising a glass to Boston’s art scene at The Big Party!

Opus Affair and Eastern Standard are throwing a fine arts cocktail celebration like Boston has never seen, transforming the entirety of Eastern Standard into a 1920s Gatsby-style garden party with games, food, cocktails, and live music. The fete celebrates outstanding arts organizations that are reaching out to young professionals—and inviting the whole city to join in.

Organizations honored will be the Young Partners of the Boston Ballet, Museum Council from the Museum of Fine Arts, H2 from the Handel and Haydn Society, 35 Below from the Huntington Theatre Company, and Young Patrons from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum will be honored.

Guests will also be invited to weigh in! If you think they’ve missed an arts organization doing outstanding outreach to young professionals, nominate that organization when you purchase your Big Party ticket. Any organization receiving at least 20 nominations will be added to the honoree list and receive a share of the party proceeds.

Tickets include an open sponsored bar, featuring beverages from Hendrick’s Gin, Drambuie, St-Germain, Fernet Branca, Notch Brewing, High and Mighty Beer, Bantam Cider, and Narragansett Beer. Food will include passed and stationed appetizers from Eastern Standard, plus oysters from Island Creek.

Guests will have a chance to play croquet on the Hendrick’s Patio, enjoy card games in the Drambuie Parlor, pose for photos in the Gallery, watch silent short films in the Screening Room, and listen to music from the Ben Powell Quartet and DJ Ryan Brown.

There will be door prizes! Free ticket drawings coordinated by ArtsBoston will feature a wide-variety of Boston-area performing arts organizations. And Every Big Party guest will leave with a gift bag, with special offers, discounts, and giveaways from our sponsors and friends.

Tickets, which include all food, drink, door prizes, entertainment, are available for $75 for the general public, but we’re offering our LUPEC friends a 20% discount. To purchase your ticket at the discounted rate of $60, visit opusaffair.org/bigparty  and enter the code LUPEC. Codes are only valid for online purchase only.

As you ponder your flapper outfit, sip on this Prohibition classic!

THE BEE’S KNEES

2 oz dry gin

1 oz honey syrup

.75 oz lemon juice

Shake ingredients in an iced cocktail shaker. Strain into a chilled vintage cocktail glass. Cin-cin!

 

LUPEC: PELO DE PERO

•previously posted in DigBoston 

sangria

Getting over that Sangria hangover …
(images courtesy of @BarHavoc)

MICHELADA
Adapted from THE CRAFT OF THE COCKTAIL by Dale DeGroff

1 oz fresh lime juice
3 dashes Tabasco sauce
.25 oz soy sauce
2 dashes Worcestershire sauce
Pinch black pepper
1 oz Maggi seasoning or Habanero sauce
12-oz beer of choice
Coarse salt for garnish

Rub a lime wedge around the lip of the glass, then dip it into a saucer of coarse salt for
garnish. Mix the first six ingredients of your choice in the bottom of a beer glass. Fill with ice
and top with your favorite beer.

 

READ BAR HAVOC’S ACCOUNT OF HER FIRST GLASS OF SUMMER SANGRIA ON#TASTELESSTUESDAYS WHILE SIPPING YOURS!

 

profile

•previously posted in DigBoston by Pink Lady

 

lupec

Amelia Earhart was already famous when she set out for her first solo flight across the Atlantic on May 20, 1932. She made headlines as the first woman passenger on a transatlantic flight four years earlier in 1928. The widely publicized event skyrocketed Earhart to international fame, earning her nicknames like “Lady Lindy” and “Queen of the Air”. Book deals, a lecture tour, her own luggage and clothing line and a spokeswomen position with Lucky Strike followed, despite Earhart’s role as merely a guest on the plane. Four years later she’d make the trip again, on her own, exactly five years after Charles Lindbergh’slandmark flight.

 

On the morning of May 20, 1932, Earhart departed Harbour Grace, Newfoundland in a cherry-red Lockheed Vega 5B bound for Paris, amid strong winds and icy conditions. The flight lasted 14 hours and 56 minutes and was plagued by mechanical problems that caused an unexpected landing in a pasture north of Derry in Northern Ireland: after “scaring all the cows in the neighborhood” she “pulled up in a farmer’s backyard.”

 

Earhart’s successful solo journey earned her a Distinguished Flying Cross from Congress, the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor from the French Government and the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society from President Herbert Hoover, and cemented her reputation as a skilled and influential female aviatrix. To her, it also proved that women were equal to men in “jobs requiring intelligence, coordination, speed, coolness and willpower.”

 

We’ll drink to that.

BLUE SKIES
1 oz Applejack
1 oz Gin
.5 oz Lemon Juice
.25 oz Simple Syrup
1 or dashes grenadine

Shake with cracked ice and strain into your favorite vintage cocktail glass.

 

Cin cin!


LUPEC: SWEET SWEDE

*previously posted in DigBoston

 

Recent LUPEC inductee Heather Mojer turned a year older Wednesday! We raise a glass to this lovely bartending lady and to her chosen cocktail moniker, a tipple that was until recently extinct: Swedish Punsch.

Not to be confused with “punch,” the liqueur evolved from Batavia Arrack, a red rice-and-sugar cane based spirit native to Southeast Asia. The Swedish East India Company is responsible for importing the stuff, which eventually became beloved by Swedes far and wide. “To mollify the sailors on board the ships, they let them dive into the Batavia Arrack that they brought back from the East Indies,” Eric Seed told theNew York Times last spring. “They would mix that with sugar and maybe a touch of the spice, and that grog they called their punch.”

Swedish Punsch began to be bottled sometime in the 19th century and was classically enjoyed warm with pea soup as a Thursday night tradition. By the early 20th century Americans were putting it in—you guessed it—cocktails. As the story so often goes, Prohibition killed any momentum the category had and it was obsolete stateside until very recently.

Could selecting a nearly extinct tipple as her LUPEC name be more in keeping with our mission to breed, raise, and release endangered cocktails into the wild? We think not. For that we salute you, Heather—happy birthday!

Raise a glass and go pay Heather a visit at Hungry Mother, where she’ll surely mix you up something fancy with the stuff.

 

MAY BLOSSON FIZZ
1 oz fresh lemon juice
1/2 oz grenadine
2 oz Swedish Punsch
Shake in iced cocktail shaker and strain into a highball glass. Fill with ice & top with soda.

 

CIN-CIN!


April in Paris*

*As originally published in DigBoston.

by Pink Lady

There are few more romantic, dreamy places to be than April in Paris—I know, I’ve been there. Watching spring emerge in the city of lights while sipping classic cocktails at the Hemingway Bar and Harry’s New York Bar, two famous haunts of Jazz Age American ex-pats was a dream come true for this little cocktail nerd. Le sigh.

Since April is now and France isn’t on the agenda this spring, LUPEC is looking forward to enjoying an incarnation of that bliss right here in Boston. On April 17th the Greater Boston Beverage Society and Opus Affair will host April in Paris at Les Zygomates, a posh night of French music, food, and drink.

We will be there with bells on. In Jazz Age attire.

Local arts non-profit and longtime LUPEC buddy Opus Affair will team up with the Greater Boston Beverage Society (aka the folks who are bringing us the Boston Cocktail Summit this October 4-6) to transport guests back to the French cabaret scene of the 1930s. Classic-inspired cocktails curated by the one and only “English Bill” Codman will be served, featuring the deliciously floral Nolet Gin, Ketel One Vodka, Don Julio tequila, St. Germain, and Moet & Chandon and other wines.

An array of French-inspired hors d’oeuvres will be on offer from the talented chefs at Les Zygomates. The piece de resistance will be a live performance from the Ben Powell Quartet in the Hot Club de France style of legendary Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt.

Tickets to April in Paris cost $50—all of which will be donated to the Greater Boston Beverage Society and their quest to put on the most amazing city-wide cocktail festival you’ve ever seen—and includes all food, drink, and music. Black tie or festive formal attire encouraged. Space is limited to just 50 people so dépêchez-vous! That means hurry up.

PARISIAN
1/3 French vermouth
1/3 creme de cassis
1/3 gin
Stir with ice and strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN! 

TO BUY TICKETS TO APRIL IN PARIS, HEAD TO OPUSAFFAIR.ORG OR VISIT LUPECBOSTON.COM. DO IT. NOW.

*previously posted in DigBoston by BILL SHANER 

      What’s up, nerds?

That’s right, we’re pretty sure reading this column means you’re a nerd about cocktails or history or both. And since you’re reading your alt-news, we’ll go so far as to guess that you may also be a book nerd too. In that case, do we have an event for you: Le Mixeur Sharky: Nine Stories.

 

On April 10 from 6-9 p.m. the good folks at The Hawthorne will host the Bostonedition of

Le Mixeur Sharky,  benefiting the Autism Centerof Mass Advocates forChildren. The cocktail party will feature nine of your favorite bartenders mixing up drinks inspired by J.D. Salinger’s titular tome. Each bartender will serve their   own creative libation for a 20-minute period as guests mix and mingle, and sample cocktails and snacks, all while raising money for a good cause.

 

Cocktail nerds among us may be familiar with Seattle-based bartender, blogger, and author of Left Coast LibationsTed Munat. Several years ago Ted and his brother Charles started Le Mixeur, a series of social events promoting creativity, community, and delicious cocktails in the Pacific Northwest. Additionally Ted is dad to an amazing boy named Sharky. Sharky has autism and Ted chronicles the joys of raising Sharky—along with the challenges of dealing with school districts, insurance companies, and “the man”—at his blog called Still Life with Shark. He developed Le Mixeur Sharky: Nine Stories as a benefit on the Left Coast. Our fearless leader, Ms. Hanky Panky decided that this time, the Right Coast should join in.

 

Sip one of these as you re-read the book. See you there, nerds.

 

 

FIHIMAFIHI

2.25 oz rosemary gin
.75 oz lemon juice
.75 oz ginger syrup
1 egg white
1 barspoon cayenne/shiraz syrup

Combine all ingredients with ice except shiraz syrup. Shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Drizzle syrup in the center of the glass. Garnish with rosemary syrup.

 

CIN-CIN!


*previously posted on March 9, 2012 in DigBoston

 

International Women’s Day is upon us, dear readers! The March 8th holiday isn’t something we celebrate with much gusto here in the states, but it’s celebrated heartily in other corners of the world. We first learned about Women’s Day from an ex-pat friend who lives in Italy, where Italian regazzi give their ladies yellow mimosas as they gather for women-only dinners and parties. Anyone who’s seen an episode of Sex and the City finds this commonplace, but in Italy, ladies night is not so. In Poland Women’s Day is similar to American Mother’s Day; in Pakistan it’s a day to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Women’s Day arose after an important protest on March 8, 1908, when 15,000 women took to the streets of New York, marching for voting rights, shorter hours, and better pay. The Socialist Party of America declared National Women’s Day to be February 28 the following year.

The first International Women’s Day was celebrated on March 19, 1911, with more than a million men and women attending rallies around the globe, campaigning for women’s rights to vote, work, and hold public office. The holiday was moved to March 8 two years later and has been celebrated then ever since. In 1975 the holiday received official sanction from the U.N. and has been an officially sponsored holiday ever since.

This International Women’s Day, why not celebrate with a cocktail from the “Lady” category?

White Lady, Chorus Lady, Creole Lady—there are several but a Pink Lady will always be my go to.

Pink Lady

1.5 oz Plymouth gin
.5 oz applejack
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz grenadine
1 egg white

Combine ingredients without ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Fill the shaker with ice and shake shake shake until frothy and delicious.

CIN-CIN!


by Pink Lady

Happy International Women’s Day! The LUPEC ladies are thrilled to raise a glass today to broads everywhere, our first toast of Women’s History Month. To learn more about International Women’s Day, check out our latest column, originally published in DigBoston.

To celebrate, order an International Women’s Day Cocktail at any of these locations helmed by LUPEC ladies and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to On the Rise, a Cambridge-based day program for women who are homeless and living in crisis.

Check out the spots listed below and follow us on Twitter for updates on what to order where, as well as any additions to this rock star list!

*The Franklin Cafe
*The Franklin Southie
*The Citizen
*The Hawthorne
*Trina’s Starlite Lounge

Join us in raising a glass to broads – for a good cause!
Cin-cin!

*Originally published in DigBoston

by Pink Lady

International Women’s Day is upon us, dear readers! The March 8th holiday isn’t something we celebrate with much gusto here in the states, but it’s celebrated heartily in other corners of the world. We first learned about Women’s Day from an ex-pat friend who lives in Italy, where Italian regazzi give their ladies yellow mimosas as they gather for women-only dinners and parties. Anyone who’s seen an episode of Sex and the City or ever happened across a huge group of girls at the bar finds this commonplace, but in Italy, ladies night is not so. In Poland Women’s Day is similar to American Mother’s Day; in Pakistan it’s a day to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Women’s Day arose after an important protest on March 8, 1908, when 15,000 women took to the streets of New York, marching for voting rights, shorter hours, and better pay. The Socialist Party of America declared National Women’s Day to be February 28 the following year.

Women’s Day went global in 1910 when the delegates to the 2nd Annual Working Women’s Conference in Copenhagen unanimously approved an International Women’s Day. The first International Women’s Day was celebrated on March 19, 1911, with more than a million men and women attending rallies around the globe, campaigning for women’s rights to vote, work, and hold public office. The holiday was moved to March 8 two years later and has been celebrated then ever since. In 1975 the holiday received official sanction from the U.N. and has been an officially sponsored holiday ever since.

This International Women’s Day, why not celebrate with a cocktail from the “Lady” category? White Lady, Chorus Lady, Creole Lady – there are several but a Pink Lady will always be my go to.

Pink Lady

1.5 oz Plymouth gin

.5 oz applejack

.5 oz fresh lemon juice

.5 oz grenadine

1 egg white

Combine ingredients without ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Fill the shaker with ice and shake shake shake until frothy and delicious.

Cin-cin!

LUPEC: LEAP DAY

*previously posted in DigBoston

 

 

Happy Leap Day, readers! Ever wonder why we add an extra day to our calendar every four years? It’s simple: the Earth actually takes 365 days and six hours to rotate around the sun, and the extra day keeps us on track with the astronomical and seasonal year. More importantly, this gives us one extra day of the year to do things we love—such as toast friends, eat a lavish meal, or drink a delicious cocktail.

Leap Day traditions in Ireland hold February 29th as the one day out of the year when it is acceptable for a woman to propose to a man—St. Bridget allegedly struck up a deal with St. Patrick to balance the traditional gender roles between men and women, just as Leap Day balances the Gregorian calendar.

Tell a modern LUPEC lady that she can’t propose to her beloved any day she wants and she’ll likely toss her well-crafted cocktail in your face. But here’s to St. Bridget for trying.

 

As February slips into March which, we LUPEC ladies see Leap Day as a chance to toast strong women everywhere. After all, March is Women’s History Month and we’ve got some great events in store for you this year, so stay tuned. For now, take a moment to raise a glass to your favorite lady bartender or fearless lady imbiber. This offering, from Hendrick’s gin, is a nod to the notion that a proposing broads was to wear a scarlet petticoat to warn her beloved of her intentions.

 

Scarlet Petticoat

1 1⁄2 parts Hendrick’s Gin
3⁄4 parts fresh Blood Orange juice
1⁄2 part Lillet Rouge
1⁄4 part Creme de Cassis
1 slice of Cucumber

In mixing glass, muddle one slice cucumber, combine remaining ingredients, add ice and shake vigorously. Double strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!