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Archive for the ‘boys club’ Category

We are SO thrilled that LUPEC’s very own Misty Kalkofen has been nominated by the Phoenix for the title of Boston’s best bartender!

At least we think they mean Misty…they nominated someone named Rusty Kalkofen from Green Street for the award. Unless Misty has an evil, equally competent bartending twin, we’re going to go ahead and assume this is a typo.

Click thru here to vote for for Misty, our fearless LUPEC leader and the only woman on the list!

Chin-chin!

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Famous MIT alumna Shirley Ann Jackson, who is now the president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, congratulates President Susan Hockfield on her inauguration

by Barbara West

May 6, 2005 was a milestone for broads in science and engineering.
That’s the day Susan Hockfield, a noted neuroscientist, was inaugurated
as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s first female president.

Perhaps surprisingly, less has been made of the fact that Dr. Hockfield
is a woman than the fact that she is the first life scientist to lead
MIT. When she was named president, the New York Times noted drolly,
“there was talk that M.I.T. was breaking new ground. What would it
mean, many wondered, if one of the world’s leading citadels of physics,
electrical engineering and other hard sciences were led for the first
time by – a biologist?”

Before coming to MIT, Dr. Hockfield was a professor of neurobiology and
provost of Yale University. Her research focused on the development of
the brain and on glioma, a deadly kind of brain cancer. Under her
leadership, MIT has launched major research initiatives focusing on two
of society’s great challenges: cancer and energy.

Even as she downplayed her gender, Dr. Hockfield was compelled to
respond, shortly after her inauguration, to then-Harvard University
President Lawrence Summers’ suggestion that one reason for the relative
scarcity of women at the upper ranks of science might be an innate
lesser ability.

“Marie Curie exploded that myth,” Dr. Hockfield and two other
university presidents, Shirley Tilghman of Princeton and John Hennessy
of Stanford, wrote in an op-ed piece that appeared in the Boston Globe.
But women need “teachers who believe in them,” they went on, and low
expectations of women “can be as destructive as overt discrimination.”

It should be noted that Dr. Hockfield’s arrival at MIT furthered a
shift that started at the Institute in 1999. That’s the year when MIT
issued a report concluding that women there suffered from widespread if
unintentional discrimination, and it pledged to work toward gender
parity. The main force behind that report was MIT biologist Nancy
Hopkins, who literally took a tape measure to her and her female
colleagues’ lab space to show the MIT administration that the women
were being allotted fewer resources than their male counterparts. So,
to toast the woman who jump-started MIT’s new wave of broads, drink one
of these:

Lady Hopkins Cocktail

1 1/2 oz Southern Comfort
1/2 oz passion fruit

3/4 oz fresh lime juice

Shake in an iced cocktail shaker & strain into a cocktail glass. Add cherry, orange slice, mint sprig.


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From Amazon.com’s description of Eric Felten’s How’s Your Drink?

Based on the popular feature in the Saturday Wall Street Journal, How’s Your Drink illuminates the culture of the cocktail. Cocktails are back after decades of decline, but the literature and lore of the classics has been missing. John F. Kennedy played nuclear brinksmanship with a gin and tonic in his hand. Teddy Roosevelt took the witness stand to testify that six mint juleps over the course of his presidency did not make him a drunk. Ernest Hemingway and Raymond Chandler both did their part to promote the gimlet. Fighting men mixed drinks with whatever liquor could be scavenged between barrages, raising glasses to celebrate victory and to ease the pain of defeat. Eric Felten tells all of these stories and many more, and also offers exhaustively researched cocktail recipes. How’s Your Drink is an essential addition to the literature of spirits and a fantastic holiday gift for husbands and fathers.

Husbands and fathers? What about sisters, mothers and wives? I’d have LOVED to have received a copy of this wonderful book in my Christmas stocking, (with any luck, my sweetie will read this post and consider getting it for me for Valentine’s Day) but after reading this little blurb of copy, I’m not sure I’m allowed!

Eric Felten’s How’s Your Drink pubbed this fall and I had the good fortune to page through Contessa’s copy shortly after it came out. It’s a great little book, but I’m shocked to see how blatantly excluded I and my fellow drinking broads have been from the publishing company’s marketing campaign.

I used to work in-house at a publishing house and I realize that Amazon uploads book description copy written impossibly early in the publishing process. I also know that Amazon is notoriously slow about making changes to said copy: so even if the publisher did want to broaden the scope of this marketing blurb, it might take them six to eight months to do it. But, come on, people! Last time I checked women aged 18-35 represented one of the most powerful purchasing demographics in the marketplace. Why so blatantly exclude us from your marketing campaign?

Fortunately, I know the book rocks, and plan to buy it anyway, thanks to the all-women’s cocktail society to which I happily belong.

Cin-cin!

Read Full Post »


From Amazon.com’s description of Eric Felten’s How’s Your Drink?

Based on the popular feature in the Saturday Wall Street Journal, How’s Your Drink illuminates the culture of the cocktail. Cocktails are back after decades of decline, but the literature and lore of the classics has been missing. John F. Kennedy played nuclear brinksmanship with a gin and tonic in his hand. Teddy Roosevelt took the witness stand to testify that six mint juleps over the course of his presidency did not make him a drunk. Ernest Hemingway and Raymond Chandler both did their part to promote the gimlet. Fighting men mixed drinks with whatever liquor could be scavenged between barrages, raising glasses to celebrate victory and to ease the pain of defeat. Eric Felten tells all of these stories and many more, and also offers exhaustively researched cocktail recipes. How’s Your Drink is an essential addition to the literature of spirits and a fantastic holiday gift for husbands and fathers.

Husbands and fathers? What about sisters, mothers and wives? I’d have LOVED to have received a copy of this wonderful book in my Christmas stocking, (with any luck, my sweetie will read this post and consider getting it for me for Valentine’s Day) but after reading this little blurb of copy, I’m not sure I’m allowed!

Eric Felten’s How’s Your Drink pubbed this fall and I had the good fortune to page through Contessa’s copy shortly after it came out. It’s a great little book, but I’m shocked to see how blatantly excluded I and my fellow drinking broads have been from the publishing company’s marketing campaign.

I used to work in-house at a publishing house and I realize that Amazon uploads book description copy written impossibly early in the publishing process. I also know that Amazon is notoriously slow about making changes to said copy: so even if the publisher did want to broaden the scope of this marketing blurb, it might take them six to eight months to do it. But, come on, people! Last time I checked women aged 18-35 represented one of the most powerful purchasing demographics in the marketplace. Why so blatantly exclude us from your marketing campaign?

Fortunately, I know the book rocks, and plan to buy it anyway, thanks to the all-women’s cocktail society to which I happily belong.

Cin-cin!

Read Full Post »

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