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Posts Tagged ‘lemon juice’

*LUPEC Boston’s latest ruminations, in case you missed ‘em in this week’s issue of the Dig.

By Pink Lady and Hanky Panky

As we discussed last week, our recent involvement in the Boston Center for Adult Education’s “From Jackie to Michelle – Celebrating the First Ladies of Fashion” fundraiser prompted us to ask ourselves “What Would Jackie/Michelle Drink?” Jackie Kennedy’s love for Daiquiris in Camelot is well documented. But what does Michelle Obama drink? Our inquiries to White House Social Secretary Desirée Rogers’ office went un-answered, so we improvised at the event, serving the Southside Cocktail to represent Ms. Obama, who grew up and raised her family in the Chicago neighborhood that bears the name.

We linked the drink to Chi-town for our event, but the Southside was well known as the house cocktail at the 21 Club in New York.  Owners Jack Kriendler and Charles E. Berns got into the Speakeasy business to help pay for night -school during Prohibition. They owned various joints around Manhattan, but once their operations moved uptown, they attracted ritzier clientele, including many Yale graduates and some classy broads, like Dorothy Parker and Edna Ferber.

The 21 Club’s secret Wine Cellar was once an elaborate system for hiding Prohibition-era hooch and was built to be virtually invisible. The entrance was shielded from fuzz’s watchful eyes by several smoked hams hanging from the ceiling and a shelf full of canned goods. The 2.5-ton door was built to look like part of the cement wall, and entry required sliding a slender 18″ meat skewer through one of the wall’s many cracks. Nowadays, the secret room is one of the most coveted private dining venues in the city.

There are lots of great tales about the 21 Club. One finds Clare Booth Luce stepping aside to allow Dorothy Parker entrance to the Club muttering, “Age before beauty,” to which Parker replied “Pearls before swine.” In another, Robert Benchley shrugs off his raincoat saying, “Get me out of this wet coat and into a dry Martini.”

Who created the cocktail?  Who knows.  But Dale DeGroff proudly and rightfully places it in the world of sours, which by definition are sweet, sour and strong: a simple combination that can be absolutely terrible if it is out of balance.

Boston Fashion Week starts in a few short days. Celebrate with one of these – we’re not sure if Michelle Obama has ever had one, but we’re sure she’d enjoy this decidedly fashionable beverage.

SOUTHSIDE COCKTAIL

1 oz fresh lemon juice
1 tsp sugar
2 mint sprigs, muddle with lemon & sugar
1 1/2 oz gin

Muddle lemon, mint, and sugar in bottom of mixing glass. Add gin & ice and shake. Strain into chilled cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!

FOR MORE GREAT COCKTAIL RECIPES, VISIT LUPECBOSTON.COM.


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by Hanky Panky

*LUPEC Boston’s latest ruminations, in case you missed ‘em in this week’s Dig

After a damp start to summer, afternoons by the pool and furloughs to the beach are upon us. When the dog days of summer come barking at my door, this LUPECer likes to put down her Hanky Panky and pick up a Collins. This classic tall drink is the perfect refresher for an afternoon on the patio.

The Collins is a tall variation of a classic punch. The most common Collins is the Tom Collins, a mixture of Old Tom Gin, lemon juice, sugar and soda water. According to David Wondrich’s Imbibe, the Tom Collins was born as the John Collins and shared its moniker with the headwaiter at Limmer’s Hotel in London. We aren’t certain how the drink made the jump from John to Tom, but most likely it was related to the drink’s use of Old Tom Gin. After the switch took place, the name John Collins became used for a bourbon Collins.

I enjoy both the Tom and John Collins, but in true LUPEC fashion, I would like to throw my hat in the ring with the Gail Collins. In 2001, Gail Collins became the first female editor of the editorial page of the New York Times. She also penned one of my favorite books on women’s history, America’s Women: 400 Years of Dolls, Drudges, Helpmates and Heroines. The Gail Collins features the current hot spirit tequila and forgoes simple syrup by using maraschino liqueur as a sweetener. The sloe gin and lemon provide refreshing tartness and balance. Grab your ice trays and build yourself a thirst-quenching Gail Collins.

GAIL COLLINS

1 oz blanco tequila

1 oz sloe gin

0.5 oz maraschino liqueur

0.5 oz lemon juice

2 dashes angostura orange bitters

soda water

Build in a Collins glass over ice. Garnish with a lemon twist.

CIN-CIN! LUPECBOSTON.COM

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on the path to find lucy stone (and bring her some booze!)

on the path to find lucy stone (and bring her some booze!)

by Pinky Gonzales

Some of us served drinks at a cemetery on Tuesday. As part of their annual Solstice celebration, the beautiful Forest Hills Cemetery asked LUPEC to serve up a drink of our choice to some odd 250+ attendees. In honor of a Forest Hills “permanent resident”, Lucy Stone, we made Stone Rickeys, and the crowd ate ‘em up (and we, er…ran out).

STONE RICKEY
1 1/2 oz gin
1/2 oz fresh squeezed lime juice
1/2 oz fresh squeezed orange juice*
1/2 oz simple syrup*
Fill with club soda
Mint sprig or orange slice garnish

Pour the gin, lime, orange, and simple syrup in a highball glass three-quarters filled with ice. Fill with club soda and stir. Garnish with mint or orange slice.

The Stone Rickey was created by Dale DeGroff. The original Gin Rickey (a much drier drink with no sugar) took it’s name from “Colonel Joe” Rickey, a lobbyist in Washington in the late nineteenth century who regularly drank with members of Congress in Shoemaker’s Bar. Colonel Joe also became, interestingly enough, the first major importer of limes to this country. The early Rickey recipe first appeared in Modern Mixed Drinks, by George Kappeler, in 1900. According to DeGroff, the expression “stone” or “California Sour” has come to mean a sour with orange juice added. The Stone Rickey recipe listed here has been adapted by LUPEC Boston (less sweet, less orange, as noted by *) to suit our tastes and to fit the more austere spirit of the revolutionary Ms. Stone.

Lucy Stone was a pioneering suffragist and abolitionist. She was the first Mass. woman to earn a college degree, and the first in the United States to keep her name after marriage (thus the coining of the term “Lucy Stoners” for those who did the same.) She was a leader in organizing the first national woman’s rights convention, held in Worcester, Mass. The speech she delievered there is said to have converted Susan B. Anthony to the suffrage cause…  She worked as an organizer and speaker for the American Anti-Slavery Society, and through this included radical speeches on women’s rights. Apparently not content to settle for all the aformentioned “firsts”, Stone went on and became the first woman in New England ever to be cremated.

Cin cin!


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by Pink Gindrink-locally

This week’s Dig column highlighted the availability of locally produced spirits.  We’d like to hear from our readers what local products you recommend.

I’ll start:  Mary at Rialto created a drink called the Journalist that uses the Berkshire Mountain Distiller’s Greylock Gin to good effect.

In the meantime, I’ll share another yummy drink that came out of the Dogfish Head stash.

MAPLE LEAF RUM VARIATION

3 parts Dogfish Head Brown Honey Rum
1 part maple syrup
1 part fresh lemon juice

Stir with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Also a bit of trivia:  The Rehoboth Beach Layaway recipe featured in the Dig is adapted from the Webster F Street Lay-Away Plan described in Steinbeck’s Sweet Thursday.  Continued appreciation to Messrs Gertsen and Montuori for these recipes and adaptations.

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