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Posts Tagged ‘French Vermouth’

*As originally published in DigBoston.

by Pink Lady

There are few more romantic, dreamy places to be than April in Paris—I know, I’ve been there. Watching spring emerge in the city of lights while sipping classic cocktails at the Hemingway Bar and Harry’s New York Bar, two famous haunts of Jazz Age American ex-pats was a dream come true for this little cocktail nerd. Le sigh.

Since April is now and France isn’t on the agenda this spring, LUPEC is looking forward to enjoying an incarnation of that bliss right here in Boston. On April 17th the Greater Boston Beverage Society and Opus Affair will host April in Paris at Les Zygomates, a posh night of French music, food, and drink.

We will be there with bells on. In Jazz Age attire.

Local arts non-profit and longtime LUPEC buddy Opus Affair will team up with the Greater Boston Beverage Society (aka the folks who are bringing us the Boston Cocktail Summit this October 4-6) to transport guests back to the French cabaret scene of the 1930s. Classic-inspired cocktails curated by the one and only “English Bill” Codman will be served, featuring the deliciously floral Nolet Gin, Ketel One Vodka, Don Julio tequila, St. Germain, and Moet & Chandon and other wines.

An array of French-inspired hors d’oeuvres will be on offer from the talented chefs at Les Zygomates. The piece de resistance will be a live performance from the Ben Powell Quartet in the Hot Club de France style of legendary Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt.

Tickets to April in Paris cost $50—all of which will be donated to the Greater Boston Beverage Society and their quest to put on the most amazing city-wide cocktail festival you’ve ever seen—and includes all food, drink, and music. Black tie or festive formal attire encouraged. Space is limited to just 50 people so dépêchez-vous! That means hurry up.

PARISIAN
1/3 French vermouth
1/3 creme de cassis
1/3 gin
Stir with ice and strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN! 

TO BUY TICKETS TO APRIL IN PARIS, HEAD TO OPUSAFFAIR.ORG OR VISIT LUPECBOSTON.COM. DO IT. NOW.

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*As recently published in the Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady + Hanky Panky

Memorial Day is nearly upon us, marking the beginning of summer (even if we’ve been having lousy, rainy weather). For the ladies of LUPEC that means its time to turn to light, refreshing cocktails. As the days become longer and warmer we like to focus on those spirits that are a bit lower in alcohol, making them perfect for the social occasions of summer that can sometimes span an entire day … such as that barbeque you’ll be hitting this Monday. Here’s a primer on some of our favorites.

Campari is a bitter Italian aperitivo. The full recipe is a closely guarded secret, but we do know that it is flavored with, among other things, rhubarb, bergamot and orange peel. When the temperature rises, pour it over ice and top with soda. If you find this too bitter, split the Campari half and half with sweet vermouth and enjoy your Americano.
Widely known for its role in James Bond’s cocktail of choice, the Vesper, Lillet Blanc is a refreshing French aperitif from Podensac in Bordeaux. It’s a blend of Bordeaux wines, fruit liqueur and quinine. At only 17% alcohol by volume, Lillet is the perfect fit for afternoon drinking on the porch. Serve Lillet on the rocks with a twist of orange. Or try the recently available Kina Lillet.

We usually associate vermouths with Martinis and Manhattans, but in the summer these fortified, aromatized wines are the perfect sip for a warm afternoon. A good choice with which to begin is Martini Bianco, a blend of dry white Italian wines flavored with vanilla and aromatic herbs.

Salut—here’s to summer!

HALF SINNER, HALF SAINT
2 oz French Vermouth
2 oz Dry Vermouth
.5 oz Herbsaint
Lemon twist
In a rocks glass, combine the vermouths over ice. Float the Herbsaint. Garnish with the lemon twist.

CIN-CIN!

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Old Hickory Cocktail

Old Hickory Cocktail

*LUPEC Boston’s latest ruminations, in case you missed ‘em in this week’s Dig…Special thanks to Pinky Gonzales who supplied this week’s suggested cocktail!

by Pink Lady

LUPEC dons our stars and stripes to celebrate the birth of our nation this week. We do so by raising a glass—after all, drinking is our national heritage.

Alcohol has been part of America since the arrival of the earliest colonists, with the tavern situated at the center of colonial life. Often one of the first permanent structures erected in some colonies, taverns were the only public buildings and doubled as a space for meetings, trials and even religious services. They played a key role in developing early business and commerce in young America.

This was the era of “dram drinking,” taking small amounts of alcohol throughout the day, all day, every day, starting with a pick-me-up in the morning and ending with a put-me-down at night. “Drinking on the job” was the norm: Craftsmen quaffed while they crafted, hired hands drank in the fields, sailors sipped at sea and so on. The commonly held belief that alcohol was medicinal and healthy, and water would only make you sick, further enabled our national bender.

In the decades after the Revolution, the spectacular bender raged on. Government figures from 1790 show annual per-capita alcohol consumption amounted to 34 gallons of beer and cider, five gallons of distilled spirits and one gallon of wine.

And early Americans were totally OK with that. In the words of a colonist from Georgia, “If I take a settler after my coffee, a cooler at nine, a bracer at 10, a whetter at 11, and two or three stiffners during the forenoon, who has any right to complain?”

Certainly not us. We toast that fierce independence with a drink famously tippled by Andrew “Old Hickory” Jackson during the Battle of New Orleans in 1815.

OLD HICKORY COCKTAIL

1 small shot French vermouth

1 small shot Italian vermouth

1 dash orange bitters

2 dashes Peychaud’s bitters

Pour the two vermouths into a bar glass and add the dash of orange bitters and the two shots of Peychaud bitters. Fill with cubes of ice and stir well. Strain into a serving glass. Twist a piece of lemon peel over, then drop it into the glass.

CIN-CIN!


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I love scotch. Scotchy, scotch, scotch. Here it goes down, down into my belly…

-Ron Burgundy

So, this week’s Dig column focused on the lovely Laphroaig, the distinctly smoky, peaty scotches the famed Islay distillery produces,  and the female distiller who helmed the operation for a generation, Bessie Williamson.

For more smoky scotch tippling, here are a few scotch recipes the ladies of LUPEC curated for an upcoming event hosted by the Boston University Scotch Club in honor of the Women’s Law Association at BU Law. Knock one of these back in honor of lady lawyers, distillers, and scotch lovers everywhere.

Cin cin!

PRINCE EDWARD

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Scotch

.75 oz Lillet Blanc

.25 oz Drambuie

Stir to chill, and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

BOBBY BURNS (Try with Highland Malt, then another with an Islay)

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Scotch

.75 oz Italian Vermouth

.25 oz Drambuie or Benedictine

1 dash Angostura bitters

Stir to chill, and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

GENTLE JOHN

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Scotch

.5 oz French Vermouth

.25 oz Cointreau

1 dash Angostura bitters

Stir to chill, and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

BLOOD & SAND

1 oz Scotch

1 oz OJ

.75 oz Cherry Heering

.75 oz Italian Vermouth

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

THE MAMIE TAYLOR COCKTAIL

1 oz Scotch

.5 oz lime juice

ginger ale

Fill a highball glass with ice. Add Scotch and lime juice and top with ginger ale.

BALVENIE ROB ROY (Also try with an Islay)

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Balvenie 12 year Scotch

.75 oz Italian Vermouth

2 dashes Angostura bitters

Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

LOCH KATRINE

A LUPEC Original, by Hanky Panky

2 oz Scotch

.5 oz Cointreau

.5 oz Lillet Blanc

muddled lavender

In a mixing glass, muddle lavender with Cointreau until fragrant. Fill with ice and add Scotch and Lillet

Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

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