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Posts Tagged ‘dry gin’

Posted in Dig Boston

As avid followers of LUPEC both here and via our social media channels (@lupecboston) know we travel far and wide for the cocktail. Once a year we pursue our love of libations at Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans and the recently established Manhattan Cocktail Classic in New York City. More recently we’ve traveled to further reaches of the country, exotic places such as the Bay Area in California or the even more rugged Portlandia, to partake of their citywide Cocktail Week festivals. We can’t thank these cities enough for blazing the trail, yet all the while we’ve mused,

“when is Boston going to get it’s own cocktail week? New York beat us to the punch, obvi, but Portlandia?

Really?

Then, like magic, the Greater Boston Beverage Society (GBBS) formed. This not-for-profit organization has been developed to “preserve and promote Boston’s cocktail and hospitality culture and spirits history while supporting local and national beverage industry related charities.” Could there be a more noble society? And while they’re at it, the GBBS will develop The Boston Cocktail Summit, a kick-ass cocktail festival of national scale slated for October 4-6, 2012.

In the meantime, as preview for the Boston Cocktail Summit, the GBBS will throw a wild party called Shakin’ It Up on Sunday, November 13th from 5-11 p.m. at House of Blues. The event will be an intimate VIP-style gala where attendees will enjoy cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, comedy, live music and the Left Bank vs. Right Bank Bartender Competition, where Boston and Cambridge bar stars will take go head-to-head in a friendly battle to determine which side of the river is home to the Boston-area’s best bartenders. Comedian Joey Carroll, Prince Tribute Band Lovesexy, and the ever energetic Dawg and Poni Show will perform. In addition to this madness there will be all the free cocktails you can drink (uh-oh), a sick silent auction and delicious hors d’ouevres.

Tickets cost $40 in advance, $50 at the door and can—and should—be purchased now.

Sip on one of these as you log online immediately to buy your tickets.

BOSTON COCKTAIL

Old Mr. Boston Deluxe Bartender’s Guide (6th edition, 1946, or before; 1st ed. 1935)

Via drinkboston.com      

3/4 oz dry gin
3/4 oz apricot nectar liqueur
1/4 oz grenadine
1/4 oz lemon juice

Shake with ice and strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!

FOR MORE GREAT COCKTAIL RECIPES VISIT LUPECBOSTON.COM.

COCKTAIL PARTY

Exactly what part of “all you can drink” are you having trouble with? Get yer tickets!

SHAKIN’ IT UP

SUN 11.13.11
HOUSE OF BLUES
15 LANSDOWNE ST.
BOSTON
5PM/21+/$40 ADV
@BOSBEVSOC
LIVENATION.COM

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by Pink Lady

Who doesn’t love a good head-to-head battle, especially when it comes to cocktails? This spring the Woodward at Ames will resurrect Cocktail Wars, one of our favorite industry events, back again after a long, cold winter’s break.

Cocktail Wars is an Iron Chef-style bartending competition that will take place every Sunday from now until May 15. Two of Boston’s best mixologists will go head-to-head to create the best cocktail using a series of secret ingredients (typically a spirit, a fruit, an herb, or a vegetable) in the allotted time. The creations will then be judged by some of Boston’s biggest industry experts (which on one magical upcoming Sunday will include a LUPEC lady).

Thirty-two bartenders from Boston’s different neighborhoods will compete during this seven-week tournament for an amazing grand prize: a weekend in New York including roundtrip airfare, swanky hotel accommodations at one of the Morgan’s Hotel Group properties and some cold, hard cash. The stakes are high for these bar stars. For the rest of us, the event means a killer party featuring snacks, a DJ and inexpensive cocktails with some of our favorite beverage industry folks.

Next up on the docket: Asher Karnes – KO Prime (Beacon Hill)
Domingo Barreras – Market at W Hotel (Theatre District)
Chris Majka – The Citizen (Worchester)
Mark Vandeusen – Tico (Back Bay)

Loryn Taplin – Coppa (South End)
Eric Smith – Mezcal Cantina (Worchester)
Jon Parsons – Sam’s at Louis Boston (Waterfront)
Don Wahl – Deuxave (Back Bay)

And mix up one of these, created by New York’s John Pomeroy when the US Bartender’s Guild of New York went head-to-head with Boston as you wait with baited breath.

LA PAROLA ULTIMA
by John S. Pomeroy, Jr.
Omnibibulous.com

1 oz dry gin
1 oz Galliano L’Autentico
1 oz Maraschino liqueur
1 oz fresh lime juice
Fresh basil

Combine ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a flamed lime disc.

[Cocktail Wars. Sundays at Woodward at Ames. 1 Court St., Boston. 617.979.8200. 5:30pm/21+/free. woodwardatames.com]

CIN-CIN!

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, as published in The Weekly Dig.

by Pinky Gonzales + Pink Lady

Women’s History Month is upon us! Today we’ll raise a glass to bartending forebroad Ada Coleman, creator of the Hanky Panky, which is also the namesake drink of LUPEC Boston founder, Misty Kalkofen.

Coleman was the first head barman at the famed American Bar in London. As the story goes, “Coley,” a mixologist of reputable character who could trash-talk with the best of them, invented the drink for a colorful bar regular. Coleman spoke of it herself, to a London newspaper in 1925:

“The late Charles Hawtrey … was one of the best judges of cocktails that I knew. Some years ago, when he was over working, he used to come into the bar and say, ‘Coley, I am tired. Give me something with a bit of punch in it.’ It was for him that I spent hours experimenting until I had invented a new cocktail. The next time he came in, I told him I had a new drink for him. He sipped it, and, draining the glass, he said, ‘By Jove! That is the real hanky-panky!’ And Hanky-Panky it has been called ever since.”

Coleman worked at the American Bar at the swank Savoy Hotel from 1903-1926, during the cocktail’s coming-out era in Europe. Owners renamed their establishments “American Bars” as a selling point—a way of distinguishing them from mere pubs or gin & tonic joints. The American craft of mixing up Sazeracs, Martinis, Ramos Gin Fizzes and the like became all the rage. Coleman’s barstools saw the likes of Charlie Chaplin, Marlene Dietrich, WC Fields, Prince of Wales and Mark Twain.

Bartender Harry Craddock filled Ada’s role managing the bar in 1924, after he had left dry America for work abroad. In 1930, he published The Savoy Cocktail Book, an Art Deco gem & many a bartender’s bible. In it, for the first time, is the printed recipe for the Hanky-Panky, below. Mix one up as you toast Coley whose spirit lives on in the likes of modern bartending broad, LUPEC’s own Hanky Panky.

HANKY-PANKY
The original, from the Savoy Cocktail Book

2 Dashes Fernet Branca
1/2 Italian Vermouth
1/2 Dry Gin

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel on top.

CIN-CIN!
FOR MORE GREAT STORIES AND LORE, VISIT LUPECBOSTON.COM.

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, originally published in the Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady

Who doesn’t love an Aviation? This drink is a tremendous cocktail that has been thankfully resurrected in recent years by classic cocktail cognoscenti. The drink recipe was first published in How to Mix Drinks by Hugo Ensslin, the German-born head bartender at the Wallick House Hotel in Times Square. His was the last cocktail manual to hit bookshelves before Prohibition begat the great drought in America (and now recently available in reprinted form from Mud Puddle Books.) Many consider this drink one of the last great cocktails to be invented before the Noble Experiment.

The Aviation has made a glorious comeback in the past five or so years and graces the cocktail list of many a fine drinking establishment from coast to coast in 2010. The formula, however, is slightly different than the original mixture. You’ll typically find this drink made following the 1930 recipe that Harry Craddock ran in his tome, the Savoy Cocktail book, which features gin, lemon juice, and Maraschino liqueur.

The aforementioned recipe makes a fine drink, to be sure. But Ensslin’s pre-Prohibition recipe used two liqueurs to give this concoction wings: Maraschino and Crème Yvette. The latter has been unavailable in the states until very recently, making this classic potation’s name a mystery. Add a hint of the new-old violet-hued Crème Yvette recently released from Cooper Spirits (or Crème de Violette if you can’t find it), and the drink takes on a sky blue hue. Aviation was still very new back in 1916 and a hot topic, thus a perfect candidate for a cocktail name.

We suggest you sidle up to any bar that stocks Crème Yvette or Crème de Violette and sample the original recipe today, just because you can.

AVIATION

.75 oz lemon juice

1.5 oz dry gin

2 dashes Maraschino

2 dashes Crème Yvette

Shake with ice in a cocktail shaker and strain into your favorite vintage cocktail glass. Garnish with a Maraschino cherry.

Cin-cin!

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