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Posts Tagged ‘Angostura’

*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, in case you missed ‘em in this week’s Dig.

by Pink Lady

If you’ve ever tried a Pisco Sour, you know the delights of the frothy drink, particularly the warm glow that steals over you after several sips. If you’re scratching your head and wondering, “WTF is Pisco???” do yourself a favor and read on.

Pisco is a distilled grape spirit that hails from Peru or Chile and is made from unique regional varietals. It’s born much in the same way as cognac or brandy, but is aged in stainless steel versus wood so typically has little to no discernible color. In its pre-Prohibition heyday, Pisco Punch was all the rage in the bars of San Francisco, with some bars devoted to serving that drink and nothing else. As the story so often goes, Prohibition nearly erased both pisco and punch from American cocktail landscape.

There are four different styles of pisco: pisco aromatica, pisco puro (single varietal), pisco acholado (a blend of aromatic and non-aromatic muscat grape clones), and pisco mosto verde (made from partially fermented grape juice.) Laws are less strict in Chile but in Peru, the production of pisco is highly regulated. A competitive marketplace yields great styles.

As a category pisco emphasizes place over process, allowing flavors of the grape to shine through by using stainless steel instead of wood for aging. Peruvian pisco is typically distilled just once or twice, and laws stipulate that the spirit cannot be rectified post-distillation so it must be distilled to proof. The quality of the grape is the measure of the distiller’s skill.

One brand of which are particularly fond is Macchu Pisco, helmed by the fabulous Melanie da Trindade-Asher. Her family-owned company also produces La Diablada, an acholado made from Quebranta, Italia, and Moscatel grapes. It’s floral, smooth, and extremely aromatic and an exciting way to try your favorite pisco cocktails. Sample a Pisco Sour with both and be changed.

PISCO SOUR

1.5 oz Macchu Pisco or La Diablada

1 oz simple syrup

.75 oz fresh lemon or lime juice

1 oz egg white

Angostura bitters

Combine the pisco, simple syrup, citrus juice, and egg white in a mxing glass. Dry shake to emulsify, then add ice and shake long and hard. Strain into a small cocktail glass. Garnish by sprinkling angostura bitters onto the egg white foam.

Cin-cin!

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*The latest ruminations from LUPEC Boston, in case you missed ‘em in the Dig.

by Pink Lady

There’s just something about The Great Gatsby: the gilded, glamorous, Jazz-era setting, the rich, drunk characters—as decadent as modern-day reality show stars. Plus, it’s a good book, a classic most people seem to have actually read, and one that LUPEC is very much looking forward to hearing again.

Not via book-on-tape, silly. At the American Repertory Theater’s latest show, GATZ, in which an employee at a low-rent business office finds a ragged old copy of The Great Gatsby in the clutter of his desk and starts to read it out loud—and doesn’t stop. It’s not a stage adaptation of The Great Gatsby, but a verbatim reading of the entire text. And it lasts six hours.

It sounds more like a “serious” episode of The Office than traditional theater, to be sure, but our faith in the A.R.T. has been sealed since they brought us Punchdrunk’s Sleep No More, which transformed an abandoned elementary school into a 1930s-era set that featured a bar, an awesome band and authentic classic cocktails. And GATZ has received rave reviews in the eight countries it’s toured since its premiere in 2006.

What better way to usher in this exciting new show than with a 1920s-themed party at the A.R.T.’s restaurant partner, Upstairs on the Square? You have our word that the drinks will be the bee’s knees. LUPEC curated the list.

We suggest you come dressed to the nines tonight, and sip a Seelbach as you don your spats and flapper hats. The drink was created at the Seelbach Hotel circa 1917, a haunt of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s as he was writing The Great Gatsby. Its history is a Lazarus tale if there ever was one: The recipe was lost during Prohibition, not drunk again until a hotel manager rediscovered and revived it in 1995. Legend has it that Gatsby was modeled on a gangster Fitzgerald met at the Seelbach Bar, probably while knocking back many of these.

Fitzgerald himself was a party man, after all, notorious for drinking too much gin with his wife Zelda and jumping into the fountains at the Plaza Hotel, boiling party guests’ watches in tomato soup and stripping down to dance naked at parties. The Seelbach was probably right up his alley. To paraphrase LUPEC member emeritus Barbara West, “One Seelbach makes you feel like you’re at a lawn party in  West Egg; a few Seelbachs make you feel like you’re in a nightclub balancing glassware on your boobs.”

Look out, Daisy, here we come.

SEELBACH COCKTAIL

1 oz bourbon

0.5 oz Cointreau

7 dashes angostura bitters

7 dashes Peychaud’s bitters

5 oz chilled brut champagne

Build in a champagne flute, stir, add champagne, stir again and garnish with an orange twist.

CIN-CIN!

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*LUPEC Boston’s latest ruminations, in case you missed ‘em in this week’s Dig.

by Pink Lady

Nothing excites the ladies of LUPEC Boston more than when endangered spirits once again become available. The latest of these to catch our fancy is Bols Genever.

We’ve discussed Genever in our little corner of the Dig before, but to refresh your memory, it is a Dutch spirit distilled from maltwine flavored with juniper and other botanicals that flowed abundantly into Holland during the heyday of the Dutch spice trade. Order a gin drink in a mid-nineteenth century barroom and this is what the barman would use as the base, an earthy, malty, backdrop softened by citrus, cordials, syrups, etc., into an elegant cocktail. Dry gin (the style we most commonly drink today) didn’t come into vogue until the late 19th century.

Genever was considered one of four main spirits categories in the pre-Prohibition Golden Age of Cocktails, holding forth on the back bar alongside whiskey, brandy, and rum. Excavating certain classic recipes without it has been clumsy business, earning the spirit a designation as “the missing ingredient in the bartender’s palate” by cocktail historian David Wondrich.

While the Dutch have continued to consume Genever abundantly, we’ve been unable to get Holland-distilled product in the states for some time (though the good folks at Anchor Brewing Company in San Francisco turn out a robust take on the category called Genevieve.) In 2007, the Lucas Bols brand revived the1820 recipe for their premium Genever, and just last month, the spirit flowed liberally into Boston with a classy, genever-soaked launch party at Drink.

Now that you can get your hot little hands on a bottle, why not taste some of those drinks as they were meant to be enjoyed? Mix up one of these for the full experience.

THE IMPROVED HOLLAND GIN COCK-TAIL

2 oz Bols Genever
1.5 bar spoons sugar syrup (2:1)
2 bar spoons Maraschino liqueur
.5 bar spoon Absinthe
2 Dashes Angostura Bitters

Combine all ingredients in a mixing tin filled with ice. Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Twist a lemon peel over the cocktail, then rub remaining lemon oil around rim of glass. Drop in the peel, and enjoy!

Cin cin!


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We LUPEC broads love to cocktail for a cause, so whenever we’re out and about and know our bar is doing their part to go green we feel pretty good stumbling home.

the perfect cocktail garnish plucked from your windowsil.

the perfect cocktail garnish plucked from your windowsil.

Kudos to some of our favorites (as mentioned in this week’s Dig), who have been doing it so long it’s old hat by now — yet still awesome. The staff at Toro in the South End has their bases covered, actively reducing their carbon footprint every day. Our favorite angle? They source locally grown and sustainably raised ingredients whenever possible, reducing the “food miles” ingredients must travel from the farm to our kitchen to your plate, and use virtually all parts of the animal being served whenever possible, harking back to rural traditions of reduced waste and delicious thrift. Additionally, all take-out products are made from biodegradable materials, all glass is recycled, biodegradable waste is composted, and an in-house water filtration system supplies guests who yearn for “Sparkling or Still.”

Christopher’s, Cambridge Common, Lizard Lounge, Toad and West Side Lounge in Cambridge use Save That Stuff for recycling and send compost to Brick Ends Farm in Hamilton. How did they get started? Owner Holly Helsop told us “It was one of our goals when we opened Christopher’s in 1981, and it’s grown from there. So we began recycling, installed an in-house water purification system (eliminating the need for bottled water)… from the very beginning.” Are patrons surprised/curious/delighted when they find out about the initiatives? Yes, however, since they “never intended to use our commitment as a ‘draw’ we haven’t really done too much in the way of publicizing what we do. We would do it anyway.” *swoon!*

Owners Bob & Mary Jo Sargent of Flora have been committed to supporting local/organic farmers for nearly two decades. Their wine list contains several biodynamic and organic wines. They even save wine corks for crafts people and local home-based wine makers — resourceful, no?

The Independent in Union Square hosts organic wines and local & craft beers, serves organic food, and recycles. Done and done!

Get your garnishes fresh and local: grow’em or find a farmer’s market at www.massfarmersmarkets.org.

More tips for your home bar can be found here, here and here.

Know of a bar worth a mention? Comment away! Know of a bar that you wish was on board? Let them know it’s important, easy, and cheap to go green.

HOME ON THE RANGE
1 oz bourbon
1 oz Red Dubonnet
1/2 oz Cointreau
1 dash Angostura bitters
Add orange & lemon peels, stir in mixing glass with ice & strain

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I love scotch. Scotchy, scotch, scotch. Here it goes down, down into my belly…

-Ron Burgundy

So, this week’s Dig column focused on the lovely Laphroaig, the distinctly smoky, peaty scotches the famed Islay distillery produces,  and the female distiller who helmed the operation for a generation, Bessie Williamson.

For more smoky scotch tippling, here are a few scotch recipes the ladies of LUPEC curated for an upcoming event hosted by the Boston University Scotch Club in honor of the Women’s Law Association at BU Law. Knock one of these back in honor of lady lawyers, distillers, and scotch lovers everywhere.

Cin cin!

PRINCE EDWARD

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Scotch

.75 oz Lillet Blanc

.25 oz Drambuie

Stir to chill, and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

BOBBY BURNS (Try with Highland Malt, then another with an Islay)

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Scotch

.75 oz Italian Vermouth

.25 oz Drambuie or Benedictine

1 dash Angostura bitters

Stir to chill, and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

GENTLE JOHN

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Scotch

.5 oz French Vermouth

.25 oz Cointreau

1 dash Angostura bitters

Stir to chill, and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

BLOOD & SAND

1 oz Scotch

1 oz OJ

.75 oz Cherry Heering

.75 oz Italian Vermouth

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

THE MAMIE TAYLOR COCKTAIL

1 oz Scotch

.5 oz lime juice

ginger ale

Fill a highball glass with ice. Add Scotch and lime juice and top with ginger ale.

BALVENIE ROB ROY (Also try with an Islay)

In a mixing glass, filled with ice, add:

2 oz Balvenie 12 year Scotch

.75 oz Italian Vermouth

2 dashes Angostura bitters

Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

LOCH KATRINE

A LUPEC Original, by Hanky Panky

2 oz Scotch

.5 oz Cointreau

.5 oz Lillet Blanc

muddled lavender

In a mixing glass, muddle lavender with Cointreau until fragrant. Fill with ice and add Scotch and Lillet

Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

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