Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Americano’

*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, in case you missed ‘em in the Dig.

by Pinky Gonzalez

In the spirit of bulletproof cocktails (read: drinks very hard to fuck up), we offer the Americano. It was born in Italy, and named for us Americans. It’s a tall, soda-and-mixers drink, and you can knock back a few of ‘em in the blazing heat without worrying about it going straight to your head.

Most bartenders won’t know what the hell you’re ordering if you ask for it by name, however, so do the following. Ask graciously if they are familiar with the highball Americano, as opposed to the (sans-alcohol) espresso with hot water. If not, kindly say something like, “It’s a little obscure but simple: equal parts Campari and sweet vermouth topped with soda in a tall rocks glass with an orange twist.”

Make sure it gets plenty of ice too. Some ‘tenders like to skimp on the rocks, lest they have to make (sigh, groan!) another trip to lug up more ice for their bin. Fill it with ice, pal.

Cinzano, the Italian (sweet) vermouth is preferred here. Campari is a scarlet-hued, bittersweet, Italian aperitif that is usually mixed with soda or used in Negronis. Campari was developed in Milan in 1860 by Gaspare Campari, using a secret recipe of aromatic herbs in a base spirit. Bark, cherry and orange peel often come to mind.

The Americano cocktail was originally known as the “Milano-Torino”—Campari from Milan (Milano) and Cinzano from Turin (Torino). During Prohibition, the Italians noticed a surge of American tourists who enjoyed the beverage. As a nod to their thirsty American visitors, the drink became known as the “Americano.”

CIN-CIN!

AMERICANO

Fill glass with ice, top with:

1 oz Campari

1 oz sweet vermouth

fill with club soda

garnish with orange peel

READ MORE FROM THE LADIES UNITED FOR THE PRESERVATION OF ENDANGERED COCKTAILS, BOSTON CHAPTER, AT LUPECBOSTON.COM.

Read Full Post »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,317 other followers