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Archive for the ‘Gin’ Category

•previously posted in DigBoston by Pink Lady

 

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Amelia Earhart was already famous when she set out for her first solo flight across the Atlantic on May 20, 1932. She made headlines as the first woman passenger on a transatlantic flight four years earlier in 1928. The widely publicized event skyrocketed Earhart to international fame, earning her nicknames like “Lady Lindy” and “Queen of the Air”. Book deals, a lecture tour, her own luggage and clothing line and a spokeswomen position with Lucky Strike followed, despite Earhart’s role as merely a guest on the plane. Four years later she’d make the trip again, on her own, exactly five years after Charles Lindbergh’slandmark flight.

 

On the morning of May 20, 1932, Earhart departed Harbour Grace, Newfoundland in a cherry-red Lockheed Vega 5B bound for Paris, amid strong winds and icy conditions. The flight lasted 14 hours and 56 minutes and was plagued by mechanical problems that caused an unexpected landing in a pasture north of Derry in Northern Ireland: after “scaring all the cows in the neighborhood” she “pulled up in a farmer’s backyard.”

 

Earhart’s successful solo journey earned her a Distinguished Flying Cross from Congress, the Cross of Knight of the Legion of Honor from the French Government and the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society from President Herbert Hoover, and cemented her reputation as a skilled and influential female aviatrix. To her, it also proved that women were equal to men in “jobs requiring intelligence, coordination, speed, coolness and willpower.”

 

We’ll drink to that.

BLUE SKIES
1 oz Applejack
1 oz Gin
.5 oz Lemon Juice
.25 oz Simple Syrup
1 or dashes grenadine

Shake with cracked ice and strain into your favorite vintage cocktail glass.

 

Cin cin!


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*previously posted in DigBoston by BILL SHANER 

      What’s up, nerds?

That’s right, we’re pretty sure reading this column means you’re a nerd about cocktails or history or both. And since you’re reading your alt-news, we’ll go so far as to guess that you may also be a book nerd too. In that case, do we have an event for you: Le Mixeur Sharky: Nine Stories.

 

On April 10 from 6-9 p.m. the good folks at The Hawthorne will host the Bostonedition of

Le Mixeur Sharky,  benefiting the Autism Centerof Mass Advocates forChildren. The cocktail party will feature nine of your favorite bartenders mixing up drinks inspired by J.D. Salinger’s titular tome. Each bartender will serve their   own creative libation for a 20-minute period as guests mix and mingle, and sample cocktails and snacks, all while raising money for a good cause.

 

Cocktail nerds among us may be familiar with Seattle-based bartender, blogger, and author of Left Coast LibationsTed Munat. Several years ago Ted and his brother Charles started Le Mixeur, a series of social events promoting creativity, community, and delicious cocktails in the Pacific Northwest. Additionally Ted is dad to an amazing boy named Sharky. Sharky has autism and Ted chronicles the joys of raising Sharky—along with the challenges of dealing with school districts, insurance companies, and “the man”—at his blog called Still Life with Shark. He developed Le Mixeur Sharky: Nine Stories as a benefit on the Left Coast. Our fearless leader, Ms. Hanky Panky decided that this time, the Right Coast should join in.

 

Sip one of these as you re-read the book. See you there, nerds.

 

 

FIHIMAFIHI

2.25 oz rosemary gin
.75 oz lemon juice
.75 oz ginger syrup
1 egg white
1 barspoon cayenne/shiraz syrup

Combine all ingredients with ice except shiraz syrup. Shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Drizzle syrup in the center of the glass. Garnish with rosemary syrup.

 

CIN-CIN!


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*previously posted on March 9, 2012 in DigBoston

 

International Women’s Day is upon us, dear readers! The March 8th holiday isn’t something we celebrate with much gusto here in the states, but it’s celebrated heartily in other corners of the world. We first learned about Women’s Day from an ex-pat friend who lives in Italy, where Italian regazzi give their ladies yellow mimosas as they gather for women-only dinners and parties. Anyone who’s seen an episode of Sex and the City finds this commonplace, but in Italy, ladies night is not so. In Poland Women’s Day is similar to American Mother’s Day; in Pakistan it’s a day to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Women’s Day arose after an important protest on March 8, 1908, when 15,000 women took to the streets of New York, marching for voting rights, shorter hours, and better pay. The Socialist Party of America declared National Women’s Day to be February 28 the following year.

The first International Women’s Day was celebrated on March 19, 1911, with more than a million men and women attending rallies around the globe, campaigning for women’s rights to vote, work, and hold public office. The holiday was moved to March 8 two years later and has been celebrated then ever since. In 1975 the holiday received official sanction from the U.N. and has been an officially sponsored holiday ever since.

This International Women’s Day, why not celebrate with a cocktail from the “Lady” category?

White Lady, Chorus Lady, Creole Lady—there are several but a Pink Lady will always be my go to.

Pink Lady

1.5 oz Plymouth gin
.5 oz applejack
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz grenadine
1 egg white

Combine ingredients without ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Fill the shaker with ice and shake shake shake until frothy and delicious.

CIN-CIN!


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*previously posted in DigBoston

 

 

Happy Leap Day, readers! Ever wonder why we add an extra day to our calendar every four years? It’s simple: the Earth actually takes 365 days and six hours to rotate around the sun, and the extra day keeps us on track with the astronomical and seasonal year. More importantly, this gives us one extra day of the year to do things we love—such as toast friends, eat a lavish meal, or drink a delicious cocktail.

Leap Day traditions in Ireland hold February 29th as the one day out of the year when it is acceptable for a woman to propose to a man—St. Bridget allegedly struck up a deal with St. Patrick to balance the traditional gender roles between men and women, just as Leap Day balances the Gregorian calendar.

Tell a modern LUPEC lady that she can’t propose to her beloved any day she wants and she’ll likely toss her well-crafted cocktail in your face. But here’s to St. Bridget for trying.

 

As February slips into March which, we LUPEC ladies see Leap Day as a chance to toast strong women everywhere. After all, March is Women’s History Month and we’ve got some great events in store for you this year, so stay tuned. For now, take a moment to raise a glass to your favorite lady bartender or fearless lady imbiber. This offering, from Hendrick’s gin, is a nod to the notion that a proposing broads was to wear a scarlet petticoat to warn her beloved of her intentions.

 

Scarlet Petticoat

1 1⁄2 parts Hendrick’s Gin
3⁄4 parts fresh Blood Orange juice
1⁄2 part Lillet Rouge
1⁄4 part Creme de Cassis
1 slice of Cucumber

In mixing glass, muddle one slice cucumber, combine remaining ingredients, add ice and shake vigorously. Double strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!


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*as posted in DigBoston

 

It’s easy to get the blues this time of year when the only holiday on the horizon is Valentine’s Day. You need a cocktail. Thus we bring you THE SNOW BALL—a LUPEC Boston Winter Prom. On January 30 the ladies of LUPEC Boston will transform the back room at Silvertone into a winter wonderland for a magical evening of dancing, drinks and awkward prom photos to benefit local women’s charityOn the Rise.

While former prom kings and queens are reliving their wonder years,

those among us who skipped prom because they were too busy listening to punk music and being vegan (cough BOURBON BELLE cough) will have a chance to enjoy Prom 2.0—complete with spiked punch, cocktails and hands below the waist.

Entry to THE SNOW BALL costs $10 and will be granted on a first come, first served basis. All of the ticket proceeds will be donated to On the Rise. Guests who bring clothing and other items deemed acceptable for donation (visit lupecboston.com for specifics) will be given tickets for complimentary drinks commensurate with their donation. Additional spiked punch and cocktails that commemorate proms throughout the ages will be available for purchase for $5-$7 each. Light appetizers will be served.

Josh Childs and Beau Sturm will guest bartend and TJ Connelly, the locally famous DJ for the Boston Red Sox and co-founder of getonthebar.com will provide musical entertainment. Guests will have an opportunity to have their moment memorialized in THE SNOW BALL photo booth.

As with all LUPEC events, dressing up is encouraged and guests are invited to come in creative formal prom attire. And yes, a prom king and queen will be crowned, so dress to impress.

Enjoy one of these as you mull over your outfit.

PINK CARNATION
1 egg white
.25 oz grenadine
.25 oz lemon juice
.25 oz Sweet cream
2oz Beefeater gin
Shake and strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!

 

COCKTAIL PARTY

Our prom date left with the art teacher. True story. Man, we really coulda used a drink back then. Heh. Yeah … we’re calling this SNOW BALL thing a total do-over.
[69 Bromfield St., Boston. 617.338.7887. 7 pm/21+/$10. silvertonedowntown.com]

 

 

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on the path to find lucy stone (and bring her some booze!)

on the path to find lucy stone (and bring her some booze!)

by Pinky Gonzales

Some of us served drinks at a cemetery on Tuesday. As part of their annual Solstice celebration, the beautiful Forest Hills Cemetery asked LUPEC to serve up a drink of our choice to some odd 250+ attendees. In honor of a Forest Hills “permanent resident”, Lucy Stone, we made Stone Rickeys, and the crowd ate ‘em up (and we, er…ran out).

STONE RICKEY
1 1/2 oz gin
1/2 oz fresh squeezed lime juice
1/2 oz fresh squeezed orange juice*
1/2 oz simple syrup*
Fill with club soda
Mint sprig or orange slice garnish

Pour the gin, lime, orange, and simple syrup in a highball glass three-quarters filled with ice. Fill with club soda and stir. Garnish with mint or orange slice.

The Stone Rickey was created by Dale DeGroff. The original Gin Rickey (a much drier drink with no sugar) took it’s name from “Colonel Joe” Rickey, a lobbyist in Washington in the late nineteenth century who regularly drank with members of Congress in Shoemaker’s Bar. Colonel Joe also became, interestingly enough, the first major importer of limes to this country. The early Rickey recipe first appeared in Modern Mixed Drinks, by George Kappeler, in 1900. According to DeGroff, the expression “stone” or “California Sour” has come to mean a sour with orange juice added. The Stone Rickey recipe listed here has been adapted by LUPEC Boston (less sweet, less orange, as noted by *) to suit our tastes and to fit the more austere spirit of the revolutionary Ms. Stone.

Lucy Stone was a pioneering suffragist and abolitionist. She was the first Mass. woman to earn a college degree, and the first in the United States to keep her name after marriage (thus the coining of the term “Lucy Stoners” for those who did the same.) She was a leader in organizing the first national woman’s rights convention, held in Worcester, Mass. The speech she delievered there is said to have converted Susan B. Anthony to the suffrage cause…  She worked as an organizer and speaker for the American Anti-Slavery Society, and through this included radical speeches on women’s rights. Apparently not content to settle for all the aformentioned “firsts”, Stone went on and became the first woman in New England ever to be cremated.

Cin cin!


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zenmartini1 by Pinky Gonzales

For those of you who consider the Pink Gin an old familiar friend (not to be confused with LUPEC member Pink Gin), below you’ll find an array of comments on its existence. For the unacquainted, or who read this week’s Dig column to the bitter end, Pink Gin is a keep-it-simple, Zen-like libation, which looks tranquil enough but can scorch your gizzard if drank with abandon. However, it’s a fine way to try various brands of gin and bitters if you wish, or simplify life in general while achieving enlightenment.

Plymouth gin is most favored here for it’s palatable smoothness and historical use. High-ranking British Royal Navy Officers were known to celebrate their high seas happy hour with straight gin-with-bitters (as opposed to swilling ubiquitous rum like their lowly, not possibly as manly, subordinates). Angostura bitters was something sailors were accustomed to as a remedy for sea sickness, fevers, and stomach disorders, so why not mix medicines, right? They referred to this cocktail as “pinkers” or “pink gin.” They even had a special flag or “gin pennant” on ship they’d hoist up announcing it was Miller time in the wardroom to other ships’ officers. It was an inconspicuous green triangle which depicted a drinking glass.

“It certainly goes a ways toward explaining how an island off the coast of Europe ended up ruling one-fourth of the earth’s land surface,” quips David Wondrich. His Esquire drinks database recipe instructs one to roll around a few good drops of Angostura in an Old-Fashioned glass, dump them out, then pour in 2 ounces of Plymouth et voilà.

Personally, I like a chilled Pink Gin, but not all my fellow LUPEC’rs do or care. Robert Hess has a good video of himself stirring up a Pink Gin and serving it in a small cocktail glass. He uses 1.5 oz of Hendrick’s in his. It’s on his excellent Small Screen Network here. If you are easily distracted like me you can mouse your cursor over the liquor bottles and watch the words “liquor bottles” pop up, or over Robert’s shirt that it declares a “bowling shirt,” etc. Just saying.

LUPEC Boston’s one-and-only water engineer and devoted Kingsley Amis fan, Pink Gin, says that the traditional Plymouth with Angostura, warm or chilled, is her preference. She was very against Amis’ preferred Booth’s Gin,  however, though she and “DUDEPEC” member K. Montuori both agree that Miller’s Gin with a little orange bitters “makes for a nice change of scenery.”

The honorary Barbara West likes Plymouth with Angostura “warm and blushing,” while LUPEC Prez Hanky Panky similarly likes “rose-colored.”

Other variations: Pink Lady says a chilled, Genever “pinker” is a positive experience. Fee’s peach bitters with Old Tom gin is a personal favorite variation, though Bourbon Belle and I do not recommend this as a way to finish off an evening of imbibing.
And lastly, Panky, Joe Rickey, and “John Collins” (Dudepec) over at Drink have been setting afire the Angostura then pouring in 2 oz Plymouth. They’ve been referring to this as “Burnt Toast”, and it is positively dee-licious.

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