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Archive for the ‘Cocktails’ Category

LUPEC: PELO DE PERO

•previously posted in DigBoston 

sangria

Getting over that Sangria hangover …
(images courtesy of @BarHavoc)

MICHELADA
Adapted from THE CRAFT OF THE COCKTAIL by Dale DeGroff

1 oz fresh lime juice
3 dashes Tabasco sauce
.25 oz soy sauce
2 dashes Worcestershire sauce
Pinch black pepper
1 oz Maggi seasoning or Habanero sauce
12-oz beer of choice
Coarse salt for garnish

Rub a lime wedge around the lip of the glass, then dip it into a saucer of coarse salt for
garnish. Mix the first six ingredients of your choice in the bottom of a beer glass. Fill with ice
and top with your favorite beer.

 

READ BAR HAVOC’S ACCOUNT OF HER FIRST GLASS OF SUMMER SANGRIA ON#TASTELESSTUESDAYS WHILE SIPPING YOURS!

 

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*previously posted in DigBoston by BILL SHANER 

      What’s up, nerds?

That’s right, we’re pretty sure reading this column means you’re a nerd about cocktails or history or both. And since you’re reading your alt-news, we’ll go so far as to guess that you may also be a book nerd too. In that case, do we have an event for you: Le Mixeur Sharky: Nine Stories.

 

On April 10 from 6-9 p.m. the good folks at The Hawthorne will host the Bostonedition of

Le Mixeur Sharky,  benefiting the Autism Centerof Mass Advocates forChildren. The cocktail party will feature nine of your favorite bartenders mixing up drinks inspired by J.D. Salinger’s titular tome. Each bartender will serve their   own creative libation for a 20-minute period as guests mix and mingle, and sample cocktails and snacks, all while raising money for a good cause.

 

Cocktail nerds among us may be familiar with Seattle-based bartender, blogger, and author of Left Coast LibationsTed Munat. Several years ago Ted and his brother Charles started Le Mixeur, a series of social events promoting creativity, community, and delicious cocktails in the Pacific Northwest. Additionally Ted is dad to an amazing boy named Sharky. Sharky has autism and Ted chronicles the joys of raising Sharky—along with the challenges of dealing with school districts, insurance companies, and “the man”—at his blog called Still Life with Shark. He developed Le Mixeur Sharky: Nine Stories as a benefit on the Left Coast. Our fearless leader, Ms. Hanky Panky decided that this time, the Right Coast should join in.

 

Sip one of these as you re-read the book. See you there, nerds.

 

 

FIHIMAFIHI

2.25 oz rosemary gin
.75 oz lemon juice
.75 oz ginger syrup
1 egg white
1 barspoon cayenne/shiraz syrup

Combine all ingredients with ice except shiraz syrup. Shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Drizzle syrup in the center of the glass. Garnish with rosemary syrup.

 

CIN-CIN!


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*previously posted on March 9, 2012 in DigBoston

 

International Women’s Day is upon us, dear readers! The March 8th holiday isn’t something we celebrate with much gusto here in the states, but it’s celebrated heartily in other corners of the world. We first learned about Women’s Day from an ex-pat friend who lives in Italy, where Italian regazzi give their ladies yellow mimosas as they gather for women-only dinners and parties. Anyone who’s seen an episode of Sex and the City finds this commonplace, but in Italy, ladies night is not so. In Poland Women’s Day is similar to American Mother’s Day; in Pakistan it’s a day to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Women’s Day arose after an important protest on March 8, 1908, when 15,000 women took to the streets of New York, marching for voting rights, shorter hours, and better pay. The Socialist Party of America declared National Women’s Day to be February 28 the following year.

The first International Women’s Day was celebrated on March 19, 1911, with more than a million men and women attending rallies around the globe, campaigning for women’s rights to vote, work, and hold public office. The holiday was moved to March 8 two years later and has been celebrated then ever since. In 1975 the holiday received official sanction from the U.N. and has been an officially sponsored holiday ever since.

This International Women’s Day, why not celebrate with a cocktail from the “Lady” category?

White Lady, Chorus Lady, Creole Lady—there are several but a Pink Lady will always be my go to.

Pink Lady

1.5 oz Plymouth gin
.5 oz applejack
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz grenadine
1 egg white

Combine ingredients without ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Fill the shaker with ice and shake shake shake until frothy and delicious.

CIN-CIN!


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*previously posted in DigBoston

 

 

Happy Leap Day, readers! Ever wonder why we add an extra day to our calendar every four years? It’s simple: the Earth actually takes 365 days and six hours to rotate around the sun, and the extra day keeps us on track with the astronomical and seasonal year. More importantly, this gives us one extra day of the year to do things we love—such as toast friends, eat a lavish meal, or drink a delicious cocktail.

Leap Day traditions in Ireland hold February 29th as the one day out of the year when it is acceptable for a woman to propose to a man—St. Bridget allegedly struck up a deal with St. Patrick to balance the traditional gender roles between men and women, just as Leap Day balances the Gregorian calendar.

Tell a modern LUPEC lady that she can’t propose to her beloved any day she wants and she’ll likely toss her well-crafted cocktail in your face. But here’s to St. Bridget for trying.

 

As February slips into March which, we LUPEC ladies see Leap Day as a chance to toast strong women everywhere. After all, March is Women’s History Month and we’ve got some great events in store for you this year, so stay tuned. For now, take a moment to raise a glass to your favorite lady bartender or fearless lady imbiber. This offering, from Hendrick’s gin, is a nod to the notion that a proposing broads was to wear a scarlet petticoat to warn her beloved of her intentions.

 

Scarlet Petticoat

1 1⁄2 parts Hendrick’s Gin
3⁄4 parts fresh Blood Orange juice
1⁄2 part Lillet Rouge
1⁄4 part Creme de Cassis
1 slice of Cucumber

In mixing glass, muddle one slice cucumber, combine remaining ingredients, add ice and shake vigorously. Double strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!


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*as posted in DigBoston

 

In a few months my very first cocktail book will be published. I have Dig Boston, our weekly deadline of cocktail columns, and devoted fans of the LUPEC blog to thank for years of readership and practice leading up to this crowning achievement. I’ve wanted to write ever since I was a little girl, and as I was looking over proofs to the book today, my little heart swelled with pride.  And what better time than the sex issue to finally reveal the fruits of my literary labor:  [drumroll, please! -Ed]the book will be called 

THE SCREAMING ORGASM.

 

Yes, it’s about cocktails with sexually suggestive names. I never could have imagined that this is how I would make my publishing debut. And you can probably imagine how mortified I was to tell my parents the title. Cocktail nerds everywhere will probably judge me. Then again, they’ve likely been doing that since I confessed my guilty pleasure cocktail (Malibu & pineapple). Or at least since I introduced you all to the Imperial Royale (Bud Light Lime and St-Germain) last August.

You’ll have to wait until June to check out this little gem. Until then, allow me to introduce you to one of my favorite drinks from its pages: Sex with the Ex.

 

Made with jalapeno, maple syrup, and cayenne pepper this drink may seem at first blush like something you just shouldn’t do.

Well, you’re right.

Sex with the Ex isn’t always the best idea, but much like this cocktail it can sometimes be spicy, invigorating and exciting. And something you should really only do once. Or once in a while.

 

SEX WITH THE EX
1 Jalapeno slice
.5 oz maple syrup
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
2 oz Plymouth gin
Cayenne pepper

Muddle jalapeno and maple syrup in a mixing glass. Add lemon juice, gin, and ice. Shake ingredients with ice in a cocktail shaker. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a pinch of cayenne pepper.

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*as posted in DigBoston

 

It’s easy to get the blues this time of year when the only holiday on the horizon is Valentine’s Day. You need a cocktail. Thus we bring you THE SNOW BALL—a LUPEC Boston Winter Prom. On January 30 the ladies of LUPEC Boston will transform the back room at Silvertone into a winter wonderland for a magical evening of dancing, drinks and awkward prom photos to benefit local women’s charityOn the Rise.

While former prom kings and queens are reliving their wonder years,

those among us who skipped prom because they were too busy listening to punk music and being vegan (cough BOURBON BELLE cough) will have a chance to enjoy Prom 2.0—complete with spiked punch, cocktails and hands below the waist.

Entry to THE SNOW BALL costs $10 and will be granted on a first come, first served basis. All of the ticket proceeds will be donated to On the Rise. Guests who bring clothing and other items deemed acceptable for donation (visit lupecboston.com for specifics) will be given tickets for complimentary drinks commensurate with their donation. Additional spiked punch and cocktails that commemorate proms throughout the ages will be available for purchase for $5-$7 each. Light appetizers will be served.

Josh Childs and Beau Sturm will guest bartend and TJ Connelly, the locally famous DJ for the Boston Red Sox and co-founder of getonthebar.com will provide musical entertainment. Guests will have an opportunity to have their moment memorialized in THE SNOW BALL photo booth.

As with all LUPEC events, dressing up is encouraged and guests are invited to come in creative formal prom attire. And yes, a prom king and queen will be crowned, so dress to impress.

Enjoy one of these as you mull over your outfit.

PINK CARNATION
1 egg white
.25 oz grenadine
.25 oz lemon juice
.25 oz Sweet cream
2oz Beefeater gin
Shake and strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!

 

COCKTAIL PARTY

Our prom date left with the art teacher. True story. Man, we really coulda used a drink back then. Heh. Yeah … we’re calling this SNOW BALL thing a total do-over.
[69 Bromfield St., Boston. 617.338.7887. 7 pm/21+/$10. silvertonedowntown.com]

 

 

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As posted on January 6, 2012 in DigBoston

 

 

LUPEC ladies love randomly decreed holidays devoted to drinking. Whether they are the clever marketing ploys or an act of Congress (i.e. National Bourbon Month), we care not.

Give us a reason to raise a glass and you bet your ass we will.

On January 11th National Hot Toddy Day will be upon us. This is a particularly celebratory arbitrary holiday in our minds as it officially commemorates the signature cocktail of LUPEC member Emma Hollander. Cheers, Emma! Below, some thoughts on lil’ Em’s favorite drink:

Why did you choose hot toddy to be your LUPEC moniker?
Because I AM a hot toddy, first of all. Duh. Secondly, because I love drinking
them.

Where’s your favorite place to drink a hot toddy?
In cold weather like this? Everywhere. Trina Starlite Lounge, home, in front of fireplaces, from travel mugs, you name it. You should drink this everywhere during winter in Boston.

What’s your favorite thing to wear while drinking hot toddies?
My Asiz Industries pineapple hoodie (asizindustries.com). Made by my homie Thomas, you should all be jealous.

What’s your favorite hot toddy recipe? 
2 oz rye, .5 oz honey simple, a lemon wedge studded with 6 cloves and hot water.
Have you ever had cold toddy?

Ummmm … if by “cold toddy” you mean whiskey neat? 

All. The. Time.

Hot Toddy bartends at the Trina’s Starlite Lounge.

—————————————————————————————————————————-

 

Yuzu Toddy
*Created by Derek Alexander
Longman & Eagle, Chicago, IL

1 part Maker’s Mark® Bourbon
2 heaping bar spoons of yuzu honey, recipe below*
.75 part Laird’s® Applejack Brandy
.5 part yuzu juice
5 parts hot water
Combine all ingredients and serve hot.
 
*Yuzu Honey
.25 cup yuzu rind .5 cup honey
10 tablespoons sugar
1.5 teaspoons pectin
2 tablespoons yuzu juice

1. Add water to yuzu rind and bring to a simmer.
2. Mix the sugar and pectin together. Stir into the water and yuzu, pouring in a thin, steady stream while stirring. Bring to a boil.
3. Add the honey and stir until the mixture is thick.
4. Add the yuzu juice. Cook for 1 minute. Remove from heat. Keep refrigerated when not in use.

CIN-CIN!

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SIPPING ON THE C

*As originally published in the Weekly Dig November 24, 2011

by Pink Lady

 

“Holidays Mean Family—We Sell Liquor” reads the sign on a packie in West Somerville, MA. It’s one of the most brilliants pieces of marketing we’ve seen, reminding us as we gather around the Thanksgiving table with family and friends that we’re probably going to want to have a cocktail in hand. Allow the LUPEC ladies to be your guide.

This Thanksgiving, we turn our attention to the humble cranberry.

We love it in cranberry sauce, both the delicious, homemade version and the weird kind that comes in a can … and actually LOOKS like a can. We also love it in cocktails. There’s more to cranberries than the sugar-filled juice that pinkens the Cosmopolitan, you see. (That said, I, for one, have been reviving the Cosmo lately. Ask for it “with Plymouth gin, please” and remember why this believed by many to be “the last classic.”)

At Toro, the Nantucket Mule is a delightful riff on the classic Moscow Mule made with cranberry compote, ginger and cranberry simple syrup, vodka, and ginger beer and served in a copper mug much like the original. It’s one of the most popular drinks on the list and sure to take the edge off as potential family drama begins to rear its head. Stop in for one tonight as you brace yourself for tomorrow’s meal.

Or mix one at home. The drink is a delight and a great way to stimulate the appetite as you prepare to stuff yourself with turkey, mashed potatoes, and stuffing tomorrow afternoon.

Happy Thanksgiving dear readers! Enjoy your cranberries and enjoy your cocktails.

 

NANTUCKET MULE
Heaping barspoon of cranberry compote
2 oz vodka
.5 oz ginger simple syrup
.5 oz cranberry simple syrup
.5 oz lime juice
Ginger beer
Combine all ingredients except ginger beer in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake. Pour into a copper mug or a double old fashioned glass. Top with ginger beer. Garnish with a lime wedge.

CIN-CIN!


 

 

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*The latest ruminations from LUPEC Boston, in case you missed ‘em in The Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady

Fellow drinkers, cocktail enthusiasts and lovers of quality beverage: We are lucky. We’re enjoying a glorious era. The cocktail is queen, and finding a quality drink in Boston is as simple as sidling up to any of the great bars in a long list of local destinations. Many of us remember a different time, a darker time, before rye was present among the spirits on the back bar, before the B-Side was even born (may it now rest in peace).

On occasion, though, we Boston drinkers might find ourselves inexplicably outside our comfort zone. Your fratty cousin comes to visit, for example, and you end up drinking with him at the Boylston Street bars (one that is misleadingly named after a spirit, perhaps?), and no matter how hard you try to explain that “Eastern Standard is, like, RIGHT THERE,” no one will budge. What’s a bratty cocktail snob to do?

A Manhattan or a classic martini is a simple enough template, but proceed with caution here—you have no idea how long that vermouth has been open, unrefrigerated and gathering dust on the back bar. A margarita should also be avoided, unless you have an unspoken affection for from-the-gun sour mix. There is a time and a place for a beer and a shot, or a gin and tonic … and many would say that this is it. If that’s not quite your speed, fear not; there are cocktails out there that simply cannot be ruined, no matter how hard an inexperienced bartender may try. So we present a new LUPEC feature for situational ordering: “Bullet-Proof Cocktails,” or “Drinks You Can’t Mess Up.”

Proud among these is the Mamie Taylor, a great old highball named for a famous Broadway star. It was the drink-du-moment for a few fleeting years around the turn of the 20th century and consumed by the thousands in the hot summer of 1900. The drink figured prominently in popular culture, writes Ted “Dr. Cocktail” Haigh in Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails: “Poems were written about the drink, jokes were told, and articles were written using Mamie to illustrate au courant sophistication.”

The Mamie’s a simple beverage composed of inexpensive ingredients, yet bars were nevertheless able to charge exorbitant prices thanks to the drink’s popularity. According to Haigh, it became “synonymous with ‘swank refreshment’ until 1920—and Prohibition.” Mamie enjoyed a brief comeback in the ’40s and was a predecessor to vodka’s gateway cocktail, the Moscow Mule.

Let’s bring Mamie back! Just … maybe don’t ask for her by name, lest you risk feeling even more uncomfortable than you already do with your fratty cousin’s “bros.”

MAMIE TAYLOR

From Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails by Ted Haigh

2 oz Scotch
.75 oz spicy ginger ale or ginger beer

Build over ice in a highball glass. Stir and garnish with lime wedge.

Notes on situational ordering: If the bar has ginger beer, lucky you! If not, or if you’re afraid to ask, ginger ale will do. If said bar does not have a fresh juice program, ask for Scotch & ginger with extra lime wedges as “garnish”—three or four should do.

CIN-CIN!

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mxmologoLUPEC Boston is honored to be hosting today’s Mixology Monday at our humble abode.  Inspired by a chance encounter that Pink Lady had with a cocktail novice, we’ve decided to consider those cocktails that would be suitably delicious for the first timer.

Obviously there are a couple things to consider when offering up advice to the amateur cocktailian.  First off your suggestions need to be balanced.  Something too bitter, too sweet or too boozey results in our possible convert spending an eternity in vodka/soda purgatory.

And secondly we should consider accessibility.  Folks are afraid of words they don’t know or understand.  And rather than ask for guidance and clarification they will often just turn and run.  Cocktails for the first timer should be relatively simple and incorporate common ingredients.  Not only do we want the cocktail newcomer to enjoy and understand what they’ve just imbibed, we want to be able to write down the recipe and make it clear that it is something they can easily create for themselves at home!

Let’s hear from some of lovely ladies of LUPEC Boston.  How would they pave thelupec_logo72 way to cocktail glory for an amateur?

Pink Lady is a firm believer in the power of the Jack Rose.  “I think in sweeter incarnations and made with a little Peychaud’s, it could easily trick booze-fearing drinkers into swilling back something made with a brown liquor.”

Bourbon Belle chimed in with the Sidecar.  She describes “the combination of the bold and interesting flavor of brandy that is juxtaposed with the sour kick of fresh lemon juice and balanced with the sweet orange flavor of Cointreau” as a great well-balanced cocktail that goes down easy for the novice drinker.

Pink Gin agrees that the brown spirits tend to be an easier sell to the cocktail beginner.  She suggests a Mint Julep (hopefully served in the proper vessel) or perhaps her father’s favorite, a Bourbon Manhattan.  If Pink Gin gets her charm from her father I’m sure he could successfully put a Manhattan in the hands of any teetotaler!

Pinky Gonzalez pipes in with some options to help a newbie recover from any previous gincidents.  She’s used the Left Bank (Gin, St Germain and Sauvignon Blanc) to make “gin-drinkers out of many an unwitting soul.”  She also recommends the Vesper, saying “it’s good for vodka drinkers/gin fearers; the idea that there is vodka in there is enough for some to ‘go there.’  The Lillet offers the vermouth-fearer an alternative and the James Bond reference is a good hook for some folks.”

As someone who spends a big chunk of my life behind the stick making drinks for the general public I’m constantly considering gateway cocktails.  There is nothing more gratifying than introducing someone whose “usual” is a vodka and soda to the wonderful world of flavorful, balanced cocktails.  For this reason I’ve taken to calling them my greatway cocktails.  For our purposes today we will be focusing on gin and whiskey, the two base spirits that seem to be most misunderstood by the masses.

Let’s start with gin.  There is an erroneous fear of gin running rampant through our society that LUPEC is attempting to quell.  Gin is delicious and according to our good friend Patrick Sullivan it makes you smarter.  Armed with this fact and a few cocktails conversion is imminent.

Fine and Dandy Cocktail (from the Savoy Cocktail Book)

1/2 Plymouth Gin

1/4 Cointreau

1/4 Lemon Juice

1 dash Angostura Bitters

Shake well and strain into a cocktail glass.

The Fine and Dandy is a greatway cocktail for many reasons.  Like Bourbon Belle’s suggestion of the Sidecar, the sweet and sour aspects of this cocktail are wonderfully balanced but do not overwhelm the nuances of the gin.  In addition this cocktail gently introduces bitters, a cocktail ingredient that unnecessarily frightens the cocktail neophyte.

imagesThe Stork Club Cocktail

1.5 oz Gin

.5 Cointreau

1 oz Orange Juice

.25 oz Lime Juice

1 Dash Angostura Bitters

Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Orange juice equals breakfast, the start to one’s day.  Why not start one’s cocktail journey with the juicy house cocktail of one of Manhattan’s most historic hot spots.

As a lover of all brown spirits I can’t imagine not enjoying a perfectly made Manhattan.  But as I know this is not the case for all let’s consider a couple of whiskey based greatway cocktails.

The Scofflaw Cocktail

1 oz Rye Whiskey

1 oz French Vermouth

.5 oz Grenadine

.5 oz Lemon Juice

1 dash Orange Bitters

Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

This delicious cocktail is perfect for introducing someone to the joys of whiskey and vermouth.   It’s sure to make a newbie ooo and ah.

The Algonquinothers_46780_8

1.5 oz Rye Whiskey

.75 oz Dry Vermouth

.75 oz Fresh Pineapple Juice

Shake and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Another juicy option for introducing folks to the joys of marrying whiskey and vermouth.  Encourage the newbie to raise her or his glass to Ms Dorothy Parker, one of our favorite forebroads and member of the Algonquin’s famed round table.

Thank you to all who have participated in our Mixology Monday saluting First Timers.  Check back in the next couple of days for our round up!

Cin Cin!

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