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Archive for the ‘Charity’ Category

by Pink Gin

The ladies of LUPEC Boston have focused their charitable energies on local women’s causes. But there are a lot of ways to give back, and here is one that helps women in developing countries.

Water For People (WFP), a non-profit organization, is a champion for people in developing countries – helping them help themselves by implementing simple, affordable water and sanitation solutions to meet the needs of their community.

Why is this a women’s issue? According to research cited by WFP:

–The average distance that women in developing countries walk to collect water per day is 6 kilometers (4 miles) and the average weight that women carry on their heads is approximately 20 kilograms (44 pounds), the same weight as airport luggage allowance. (WSSCC, 2004)

–Almost 70% of the world’s citizens living in poverty are women. (World Water Day, 2001)

Water For People projects impact entire communities—hundreds of people. Safe drinking water and adequate sanitation can change the economic climate because people are able to work and build businesses. Children are less likely to be ill and can attend school. Women are free from tedious water collection and are free to take care of their families and generate income. Entrepreneurs sprout up around the water project, finding creative ways to begin new businesses related to this new community asset.

So — in the spirit of LUPEC Boston’s belief that having fun and making the world a better place are not contradictory – check out the Water For People Gala Celebration!

This event features:

–High-scoring dining
–Pre-Gala tours of Fenway Park
–Live jazz entertainment
–Live auction of Red Sox memorabilia
–Special MC – WCVB’s Karen Holmes Ward

Proceeds from this event will go directly to WFP, so your contribution will have a significant impact on the lives of impoverished people worldwide.

Sponsorship opportunities and tickets are available now!

And if you can’t make it to the event, we suggest raising a Croton Cocktail in one hand (as you make out a generous donation check with the other) in honor of this great cause.

A salut!

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During World War II American Red Cross services were in high gear. By the wars end in 1945, over 7.5 million volunteers supported 40,000 paid Red Cross staff around the world. “Nearly every family in America contained a member who had either served as a Red Cross volunteer, made contributions of money or blood, or was a recipient of Red Cross services.”

My family’s Red Cross volunteer was my Great Aunt Kay.

On June 6, 1945, just about a month after VE Day, Kay Kehoe boarded the Queen Mary to Europe, where she spent the next 18 months traveling all over Great Britain and the Continent as a Clubmobiler. Red Cross Service Clubs offered meals, recreational activities, overnight accommodations and amenities like barbershops and laundries to American soldiers stationed all over the world; Clubmobiles were designed to be like service clubs on wheels.

These half-ton trucks and single-deck buses, acquired by the Red Cross from a former London bus company, were converted to literal welcome wagons. Each was operated by three American Red Cross women and a local driver, and were equipped for “making and serving coffee and doughnuts and for distributing newspapers, chewing gum, and other small items” to the troops. Some had phonographs and loudspeakers, and others were even outfitted with movie projectors.

Kay Kehoe disembarked from the Queen Mary in Scotland, and didn’t stop traveling for the next 18 months. She and the girls of Clubmobile Group A boarded a train from Scotland to England, then took a boat across the chilly English channel to France, then boarded another train to Paris. From there, they traveled all over Europe in a truck the size of an ambulance, delivering coffee and doughnuts to troops through the truck’s windows. Occasionally they’d stop in service clubs — Kay remembers a particularly big one in Berlin — where they’d work as ‘club girls’, acting as hostesses to the troops. But being on the road was the type of service Kay Kehoe liked best.

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When it got too hot on the dusty French roads in the summer, the girls of Clubmobile A served lemonade in place of coffee. “Most of the boys were in a staging area, just waiting to go home,” says Kehoe. “We’d serve them their lemonade and doughnuts and gab with them, and sometimes they’d invite you to come to the G.I. Club for a dance. There we’d dance and listen to records, and they had beer and soda and pretty much anything you wanted at the clubs.”

As for cocktails, says Kay, “they didn’t have the kinds of ingredients you’d need to make fancy drinks, like Martinis, Old Fashions, and Manhattans. But, since it was France, you could pretty much always get your hands on cognac, and all the G.I. Clubs had Coca Cola.” So that’s what they drank.

This weekend, let’s raise a glass to Kay Kehoe and the girls of Clubmobile A!

Clubmobile Cocktail

1 1/2 oz Cognac
Fill glass with Coca Cola
Serve in a highball glass


A votre sante!

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Don’t miss LUPEC Boston’s own Lauren Clark on THE CHET CURTIS REPORT

Tomorrow night Lauren Clark,
LUPEC Boston member and founder of Drinkboston.com,
will appear on the CHET CURTIS REPORT‘ on NECN!

Lauren will chat with Chet about all things LUPEC, and
teach viewers how to make a classic cocktail that’s bound to wow the entire family this Thanksgiving.

Tune in Friday, November 16th @ 8 p.m. ET on NECN!


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Thank you to all who attended the tenth annual Operation Frontline Dinner at Tremont 647 last week! Also a huge thank you to Matt Lambo and Triple Eight Distillery for donating the delicious Triple Eight Cranberry Vodka that the ladies of LUPEC used to make the Petticoat Row! If you weren’t able to attend, but are interested in our newest cocktail creation here’s the recipe and the history of the name!

LUPEC Boston’s Petticoat Row

2 parts Triple Eight Cranberry Vodka
1 part Fresh Orange Juice
1 part Spiced Simple Syrup*
Chill the above mixture in a shaker with ice. Strain into a flute, filling the flute halfway. Fill the flute with Prosecco and enjoy!

The Petticoat Row is named after the shops located along Centre Street on Nantucket. This area acquired it’s nickname in the 19th Century when, while most women were mothers and homemakers, the majority of these shops were owned and operated by the wives of whalers who would be at sea for years at a time. Cheers to our forebroads of Nantucket!

Spiced Simple Syrup
Place one cup of water, 12 whole cloves, 1 or 2 star anise, and 1/8th teaspoon ground cinnamon in a small saucepan and stir to combine. Bring to a gentle boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer for 2 minutes. Add 2 cups sugar and simmer until the sugar is completely dissolved and the syrup is slightly thickened, about 2 minutes more.
Remove from the heat and let cool. Remove the cloves and star anise with a slotted spoon. Syrup will keep for up to four weeks when refrigerated.
Recipe from “Raising the Bar”by Nick Mautone

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Then you missed the lovely ladies of LUPEC spreading the love through tiny little cocktails in tiny little plastic cups! Here’s a bit about our cocktail of the evening!

PEGU CLUB COCKTAIL
1.5 oz Plymouth Gin
.5 oz Orange Curacao
.5 oz Fresh Lime Juice
1 dash Angostura Bitters
1 dash Orange Bitters

Forty miles up the Rangoon River, the Pegu Club was a British Colonial Officer’s club near the Gulf of Martaban in Burma. The house cocktail, bearing the same name, was created sometime before 1930 when it was referencesd by master mixologist Harry Craddock in the Savoy Cocktail Book as having “traveled, and is asked for, round the world.”

After several years as the beverage director at Bemelman’s Bar in the Carlyle Hotel, modern master mixologist Audrey Saunders sought to bring bask the true art of the cocktail culture by opening her Pegu Club at 77 W Houston St in Manhatttan in 2005. Applying a more culinary approach to her cocktails, Audrey describes the process as the beverage equivalent of the slow food movement. Bucking the current vodka trend she consistently creates cocktails highlighting unjustly neglected spirits that challenge the cocktail neophyte as well as the cocktail connoisseur.

Thanks to everyone who joined us that night! Also, huge thanks to our friends at Toro who kindly shared their table with us and our friends at Future Brands who donated Plymouth Gin!

Cheers!

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