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Archive for the ‘Broads’ Category

*Originally published in DigBoston

by Pink Lady

International Women’s Day is upon us, dear readers! The March 8th holiday isn’t something we celebrate with much gusto here in the states, but it’s celebrated heartily in other corners of the world. We first learned about Women’s Day from an ex-pat friend who lives in Italy, where Italian regazzi give their ladies yellow mimosas as they gather for women-only dinners and parties. Anyone who’s seen an episode of Sex and the City or ever happened across a huge group of girls at the bar finds this commonplace, but in Italy, ladies night is not so. In Poland Women’s Day is similar to American Mother’s Day; in Pakistan it’s a day to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Women’s Day arose after an important protest on March 8, 1908, when 15,000 women took to the streets of New York, marching for voting rights, shorter hours, and better pay. The Socialist Party of America declared National Women’s Day to be February 28 the following year.

Women’s Day went global in 1910 when the delegates to the 2nd Annual Working Women’s Conference in Copenhagen unanimously approved an International Women’s Day. The first International Women’s Day was celebrated on March 19, 1911, with more than a million men and women attending rallies around the globe, campaigning for women’s rights to vote, work, and hold public office. The holiday was moved to March 8 two years later and has been celebrated then ever since. In 1975 the holiday received official sanction from the U.N. and has been an officially sponsored holiday ever since.

This International Women’s Day, why not celebrate with a cocktail from the “Lady” category? White Lady, Chorus Lady, Creole Lady – there are several but a Pink Lady will always be my go to.

Pink Lady

1.5 oz Plymouth gin

.5 oz applejack

.5 oz fresh lemon juice

.5 oz grenadine

1 egg white

Combine ingredients without ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Fill the shaker with ice and shake shake shake until frothy and delicious.

Cin-cin!

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC, as originally published in The Weekly Dig.

by Barbara West

“Mary S.” of St. Louis, Missouri (c. 1851-1880) was an inventor who led a life of genius and poverty. Lacking finances and confidence, she sold the rights to her mechanical inventions to various male agents, for as little as $5 each. These men received 53 patents and a great deal of wealth. Mary S. herself died impoverished at roughly age thirty.

A businesswoman and former intelligence agent for the Union army during the Civil War, Charlotte Smith was known for empathizing with the struggles of self-supporting women.

The tragic story of Mary S. spurred Smith, an acquaintance, to seek justice and recognition for women inventors. She wrote about Mary S. in The Woman Inventor, a magazine she founded in 1891. She also pushed for the publication of an official List of Women Patentees. Feminists used the list to argue for women’s suffrage. Today, the list remains the major source of information on 19th-century female inventors. These women were patronizingly dubbed “Lady Edisons.”

Thanks to the list, we know that nearly 4,000 women received U.S. patents between 1809 and 1895—more than 5,000 if design patents are counted. One of the era’s most prolific female inventors was Margaret Knight of Boston (1838-1914). She is credited with about 90 inventions and 22 patents, the most famous of which was the first machine to make the square-bottomed paper bags that are still used in grocery stores today.

In the late 1890s, Smith moved to Boston, where she founded a Women’s Rescue League. In 1907, she organized a Woman’s Board of Trade. After spending thousands of dollars on projects to help women become self-supporting, and years of direct charity to homeless and desperate women, Charlotte Smith died alone in Boston in 1917. She was seventy-seven.

Here’s a cocktail with which to toast our industrious forebroads, known as “Lady Edisons,” this Women’s History Month.

EDISONIAN COCKTAIL

2 ounces brandy
1 ounce Campari
1 ounce fresh lemon juice

Shake brandy, Campari and lemon juice with ice. Strain into a cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston in case you missed ‘em in this week’s Dig.

by Pink Gin

Billie Holiday is remembered as one of history’s greatest jazz singers. Her haunting voice had a limited range (barely an octave), but she sang with a unique, laid-back style that was inspired by mellow legends like Louis Armstrong and Bessie Smith. Holiday passed before our time, but luckily, the Lyric Stage Company’s latest production, Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill, featuring Jacqui Parker as Billie Holiday, gives us a glimpse into Holiday’s live performance and backstage drama.

Holiday’s life reflects the highs and lows of the Jazz Era. After a difficult childhood in Baltimore, she moved to New York City and sang for tips in Harlem nightclubs. She went on to perform regularly in New York, tour with Artie Shaw’s white band and make a number of recordings. A tough broad who would drink, swear and win big at dice (how cool is that?!), she would also walk out on anyone who tried to control her. But the hard life and, oh yeah, some heroin abuse, took its toll; she died at the age of 44.

The story of Holiday’s life (and its sad brevity) is just one example of what inspires LUPEC Boston to work with women’s charities. Our “cocktails for a cause” events help bring the Boston community together while raising awareness about the challenges many women face in realizing their full potential.

One of the recordings (which featured Benny Goodman and Teddy Wilson) that launched Holiday’s career was “What a Little Moonlight Can Do.” We therefore raise a glass of this Gary Regan interpretation of the Aviation.

THE MOONLIGHT COCKTAIL

1 1/2 oz gin

1/2 oz Cointreau

1/2 oz crème de violette

1/2 oz fresh lime juice

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled champagne flute.

SEE LADY DAY AT THE LYRIC STAGE COMPANY [140 CLARENDON ST., BOSTON. 617.585.5678. LYRICSTAGE.COM] THROUGH APRIL 24TH, AND FIND OUT MORE ABOUT COCKTAILS FOR A CAUSE AT LUPECBOSTON.COM.

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, in case you missed ‘em in The Weekly Dig.

by Pinky Gonzales

Competent males have coached females throughout history in figure skating, ballet, softball, gymnastics and other sports often stereotyped as “ladies’ domain”, with scant resistance. Women coaches of “macho” sports have been virtually nonexistent, and last year among the 15,675 U.S. high school football coaches, not one had a set of ovaries. Enter three competent women who have broken the gridiron glass ceiling.

Randolph using brute force

29 year old science teacher, former track star, and IWFL wide receiver Natalie Randolph was just named the country’s first head varsity football coach, at Coolidge High in Washington, D.C.  This means she could not only explain how Belichik ran a slant against man-under coverage while the free safety was cheating, but could also divulge the molecular structure of your Coors-soaked Doritos. Awesome.

A mention of Randolph, however, is incomplete without that of Jennifer Oliveri and Wanda Oates.  In 1985, Oates was named head FB coach at Ballou High in D.C., only to be ousted the same dad-gum week by opposing coaches who didn’t want to compete with a woman. Then there’s our own hometown hero, Hull’s Pop Warner football coach Jennifer Oliveri. She was appointed last year to skipper the boys’ team and seems to love guiding her 7 to 10 year olds just as much as playing. As a kid she played on all-male teams, and like Randolph, Oliveri went on to play pro, for the Boston Militia (see them here on June 5th face Randolph’s old team the D.C. Divas!)

In their compelling 2007 book, Playing With the Boys: Why Separate is Not Equal in Sports, local scholars Eileen McDonagh and Laura Pappano convincingly argue that athletics are the last real frontier of gender inequality in America. Sports, especially pro, help define what we mean by “success.” Politics and higher education throughout history had once been boys-only (and whites-only, for that matter) clubs too, but when you see how that’s changing and how inspirational it can be for generations of young people, you can visualize how positive a thing a black female coach on a football field can be.

Here’s a toast to these courageous broads, with a simple libation that packs a punch.

Cheers!

LAST FRONTIER

2 1/2 oz Junipero gin

1/2 oz green Chartreuse

Lemon peel

Fill a shaker with ice and stir liquids for 20 sec. Twist and rub the oils of a lemon peel around the rim of a chilled cocktail glass, then strain in drink. Discard peel.

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by Pink Lady

Raise a glass today – because  you can! On this day in 1933 the 21st Amendment was ratified in Utah,  the final state needed to repeal Prohibition by a three quarters majority, restoring the American right to manufacture, sell, and transport alcohol. To learn more about Prohibition, why it became enacted in the first place in 1919 and enforced the following year, how it increased rather than deterred our nation’s desire for drink, and the ripple effects we still feel today, check out repealday.org.

As you raise a glass, you can also check out this story from the LUPEC archives on Speakeasy owner, Texas Guinan, originally printed in the Weekly Dig last December.

by Pink Lady

If there is any time to channel your inner flapper, it is this Friday: the 75th anniversary of Prohibition’s repeal. This week, the ladies of LUPEC raise a glass to those who kept the party going during those dry years, like the legendary Texas Guinan.

Texas (née Mary Louise Cecilia) Guinan got her start on Broadway and then moved to Hollywood, where she starred in silent films. She played the first movie cowgirl in her debut, The Wildcat, and enjoyed several years as Hollywood’s “Queen of the West” before returning to New York in 1922.

Soon Guinan was turning a fine profit selling illegal hooch at speakeasies like the El Fey Club, which she opened with gangster Larry Fay. She went on to open her own 300 Club, where she famously greeted guests with, “Hello, Suckers! Come on in and leave your wallet on the bar.” Booze, beautiful hostesses and chorus girls distracted clientele from the high-priced cocktails.

Guinan’s joints were frequently raided by feds, but she never owned up to selling alcohol, innocently declaring, “A man could get hurt falling off a bar stool!” Re-opening after raids, she would sometimes wear a necklace of gold padlocks to show the cops there were no hard feelings. When one club was padlocked, she simply opened a new one.

Guinan died on November 5, 1933, just a month before the end of America’s 13-year dry spell. The New York Times reported a crowd of “something like 10,000 to 12,000 persons” paid respects at her wake. We’ll pay ours by toasting the late, great Tex with one of these.

Cin-cin!

LITTLE DEVIL COCKTAIL | FROM THE SAVOY COCKTAIL BOOK

2 parts Bacardi rum

2 parts dry gin

1 part Cointreau

1 part lemon juice

Shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

CLICK HERE AND HERE TO READ MORE ABOUT TEXAS GUINAN.

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by Pink Lady

Sounds counterintuitive that the ladies of LUPEC Boston had to go to New Orleans to meet some amazing regional people, huh? That’s Tales of the Cocktail for you, connecting like-minded drinkers the world over.

One of our new favorite near locals is Deirdre Heekin, author of a new memoir of her drinking life, Libation: A Bitter Alchemy. Deirdre co-owns Pane e Salute, an acclaimed osteria in Woodstock, VT, where she curates an eclectic niche wine list. A lover of Pimm’s who dabbles in wine-making, she is a woman after LUPEC Boston’s heart. We plan to read and report about her new book…as soon as our hangover subsides.

In the interim, Deirdre and her husband/business partner Caleb Barber be  will be appearing at the Institute of Contemporary Art’s
Talking Taste series in Boston tomorrow, Friday, July 24th @ 6:30 p.m. The talk is free with the price of admission to the museum – a perfect Friday night outing before or after stopping by Drink for a drink.

Cin cin!

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on the path to find lucy stone (and bring her some booze!)

on the path to find lucy stone (and bring her some booze!)

by Pinky Gonzales

Some of us served drinks at a cemetery on Tuesday. As part of their annual Solstice celebration, the beautiful Forest Hills Cemetery asked LUPEC to serve up a drink of our choice to some odd 250+ attendees. In honor of a Forest Hills “permanent resident”, Lucy Stone, we made Stone Rickeys, and the crowd ate ‘em up (and we, er…ran out).

STONE RICKEY
1 1/2 oz gin
1/2 oz fresh squeezed lime juice
1/2 oz fresh squeezed orange juice*
1/2 oz simple syrup*
Fill with club soda
Mint sprig or orange slice garnish

Pour the gin, lime, orange, and simple syrup in a highball glass three-quarters filled with ice. Fill with club soda and stir. Garnish with mint or orange slice.

The Stone Rickey was created by Dale DeGroff. The original Gin Rickey (a much drier drink with no sugar) took it’s name from “Colonel Joe” Rickey, a lobbyist in Washington in the late nineteenth century who regularly drank with members of Congress in Shoemaker’s Bar. Colonel Joe also became, interestingly enough, the first major importer of limes to this country. The early Rickey recipe first appeared in Modern Mixed Drinks, by George Kappeler, in 1900. According to DeGroff, the expression “stone” or “California Sour” has come to mean a sour with orange juice added. The Stone Rickey recipe listed here has been adapted by LUPEC Boston (less sweet, less orange, as noted by *) to suit our tastes and to fit the more austere spirit of the revolutionary Ms. Stone.

Lucy Stone was a pioneering suffragist and abolitionist. She was the first Mass. woman to earn a college degree, and the first in the United States to keep her name after marriage (thus the coining of the term “Lucy Stoners” for those who did the same.) She was a leader in organizing the first national woman’s rights convention, held in Worcester, Mass. The speech she delievered there is said to have converted Susan B. Anthony to the suffrage cause…  She worked as an organizer and speaker for the American Anti-Slavery Society, and through this included radical speeches on women’s rights. Apparently not content to settle for all the aformentioned “firsts”, Stone went on and became the first woman in New England ever to be cremated.

Cin cin!


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