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Archive for March, 2012

*previously posted on March 9, 2012 in DigBoston

 

International Women’s Day is upon us, dear readers! The March 8th holiday isn’t something we celebrate with much gusto here in the states, but it’s celebrated heartily in other corners of the world. We first learned about Women’s Day from an ex-pat friend who lives in Italy, where Italian regazzi give their ladies yellow mimosas as they gather for women-only dinners and parties. Anyone who’s seen an episode of Sex and the City finds this commonplace, but in Italy, ladies night is not so. In Poland Women’s Day is similar to American Mother’s Day; in Pakistan it’s a day to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Women’s Day arose after an important protest on March 8, 1908, when 15,000 women took to the streets of New York, marching for voting rights, shorter hours, and better pay. The Socialist Party of America declared National Women’s Day to be February 28 the following year.

The first International Women’s Day was celebrated on March 19, 1911, with more than a million men and women attending rallies around the globe, campaigning for women’s rights to vote, work, and hold public office. The holiday was moved to March 8 two years later and has been celebrated then ever since. In 1975 the holiday received official sanction from the U.N. and has been an officially sponsored holiday ever since.

This International Women’s Day, why not celebrate with a cocktail from the “Lady” category?

White Lady, Chorus Lady, Creole Lady—there are several but a Pink Lady will always be my go to.

Pink Lady

1.5 oz Plymouth gin
.5 oz applejack
.5 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz grenadine
1 egg white

Combine ingredients without ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Fill the shaker with ice and shake shake shake until frothy and delicious.

CIN-CIN!


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by Pink Lady

Happy International Women’s Day! The LUPEC ladies are thrilled to raise a glass today to broads everywhere, our first toast of Women’s History Month. To learn more about International Women’s Day, check out our latest column, originally published in DigBoston.

To celebrate, order an International Women’s Day Cocktail at any of these locations helmed by LUPEC ladies and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to On the Rise, a Cambridge-based day program for women who are homeless and living in crisis.

Check out the spots listed below and follow us on Twitter for updates on what to order where, as well as any additions to this rock star list!

*The Franklin Cafe
*The Franklin Southie
*The Citizen
*The Hawthorne
*Trina’s Starlite Lounge

Join us in raising a glass to broads – for a good cause!
Cin-cin!

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*Originally published in DigBoston

by Pink Lady

International Women’s Day is upon us, dear readers! The March 8th holiday isn’t something we celebrate with much gusto here in the states, but it’s celebrated heartily in other corners of the world. We first learned about Women’s Day from an ex-pat friend who lives in Italy, where Italian regazzi give their ladies yellow mimosas as they gather for women-only dinners and parties. Anyone who’s seen an episode of Sex and the City or ever happened across a huge group of girls at the bar finds this commonplace, but in Italy, ladies night is not so. In Poland Women’s Day is similar to American Mother’s Day; in Pakistan it’s a day to commemorate the struggle for women’s rights.

Women’s Day arose after an important protest on March 8, 1908, when 15,000 women took to the streets of New York, marching for voting rights, shorter hours, and better pay. The Socialist Party of America declared National Women’s Day to be February 28 the following year.

Women’s Day went global in 1910 when the delegates to the 2nd Annual Working Women’s Conference in Copenhagen unanimously approved an International Women’s Day. The first International Women’s Day was celebrated on March 19, 1911, with more than a million men and women attending rallies around the globe, campaigning for women’s rights to vote, work, and hold public office. The holiday was moved to March 8 two years later and has been celebrated then ever since. In 1975 the holiday received official sanction from the U.N. and has been an officially sponsored holiday ever since.

This International Women’s Day, why not celebrate with a cocktail from the “Lady” category? White Lady, Chorus Lady, Creole Lady – there are several but a Pink Lady will always be my go to.

Pink Lady

1.5 oz Plymouth gin

.5 oz applejack

.5 oz fresh lemon juice

.5 oz grenadine

1 egg white

Combine ingredients without ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously for 20 seconds. Fill the shaker with ice and shake shake shake until frothy and delicious.

Cin-cin!

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*previously posted in DigBoston

 

 

Happy Leap Day, readers! Ever wonder why we add an extra day to our calendar every four years? It’s simple: the Earth actually takes 365 days and six hours to rotate around the sun, and the extra day keeps us on track with the astronomical and seasonal year. More importantly, this gives us one extra day of the year to do things we love—such as toast friends, eat a lavish meal, or drink a delicious cocktail.

Leap Day traditions in Ireland hold February 29th as the one day out of the year when it is acceptable for a woman to propose to a man—St. Bridget allegedly struck up a deal with St. Patrick to balance the traditional gender roles between men and women, just as Leap Day balances the Gregorian calendar.

Tell a modern LUPEC lady that she can’t propose to her beloved any day she wants and she’ll likely toss her well-crafted cocktail in your face. But here’s to St. Bridget for trying.

 

As February slips into March which, we LUPEC ladies see Leap Day as a chance to toast strong women everywhere. After all, March is Women’s History Month and we’ve got some great events in store for you this year, so stay tuned. For now, take a moment to raise a glass to your favorite lady bartender or fearless lady imbiber. This offering, from Hendrick’s gin, is a nod to the notion that a proposing broads was to wear a scarlet petticoat to warn her beloved of her intentions.

 

Scarlet Petticoat

1 1⁄2 parts Hendrick’s Gin
3⁄4 parts fresh Blood Orange juice
1⁄2 part Lillet Rouge
1⁄4 part Creme de Cassis
1 slice of Cucumber

In mixing glass, muddle one slice cucumber, combine remaining ingredients, add ice and shake vigorously. Double strain into cocktail glass.

CIN-CIN!


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