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Archive for December, 2010

*As originally published in the Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady

Hangovers are a part of serious imbibing, as we were unpleasantly reminded the morning after our punch party last week. With New Years Eve nearly upon us, we wanted to offer a brief round up of strategies to help you cope the morning after:

Preventative Measures
As Pink Gin says, “You need to plan on the possibility that you’ll skip the night-before remedy. If you remember it, do you really need it?” Make these suggestions your mantra during the day while sober and you just may remember to follow them later in the evening:

Slow Your Roll Early: Have some nice, low alcohol sips in mind when you belly up to the bar. Cocktails made with low-alcohol liqueurs, like a Campari & soda, vermouth-based Half Sinner, Half Saint, or a San Francisco can keep you from getting too drunk too fast.

Water, water, water: Just do it. A glass between drinks is a good metric.

Eat. A Lot.: Eat a healthy portion of your dinner, even if you’re feeling full from all the water you’re drinking. You body will thank you. And, depending on how late you stay up, a second dinner might be appropriate.

Herbal Remedies as a Preemptive Strike: Take milk thistle before you start drinking (for your liver), B12 & B6 (for your hangover). One LUPEC pal swears by activated carbon pills: 2 with the first drink, one per each additional drink. All can be purchased at Whole Foods.

Morning-After Measures
Upon waking, you will likely need to ease into your day with a hearty breakfast, coconut water, ginger ale or beer, and a healthy dose of Advil. As Charles H. Baker writes of the “sort of human withering on the vine” that is the hangover in The Gentleman’s Companion, (repubbed as Jigger, Beaker, and Glass), the “Picker-Upper” is the only possible cure for when you feel “precisely like Death warmed up”: “We have…come to distrust all revivers smacking of drugdom. It is a small, tightly vicious cycle to get into, and a bit of well-aged spirits with this or that, seems much safer and more pleasant than corroding our innards with chemicals of violent proclivities, and possible habit-forming ways.”

After all, there are just two proven ways to never get a hangover: never start drinking or never stop. Once you’re ready for a little hair of the dog, any of these recipes should do:

Andy McNees’ Hangover Eraser Nos 1 & 2: For the original, build the following over ice in a pint glass: A shot of Fernet, two dashes of every kind of bitters on the bar, top with Soda water. Drink as quickly as you can through two straws like a Mind Eraser. See below for recipe No. 2.

Bloody Marys: There’s a good amount of vitamins in that there tomato juice.

Fizzes: During the pre-Prohibition heyday of the cocktail, the fizz held forth as the hangover cure de rigeur for sporting men. “Into the saloon you’d go, the kindly internist behind the bar would manipulate a bottle or two, and zam! There stood the glass packed with vitamins, proteins, and complex sugars, foaming brightly and aglow with the promise of sweet release,” writes David Wondrich in Imbibe! If you’ve never tried a Pink Lady before, now’s the time.

Good luck to you, dear readers! As Virginia Elliot and Phil D. Strong wrote in their 1930 volume Shake ‘Em Up, always remember to “Take cheer from the thought that if you are healthy enough to suffer acutely, you will probably live.”

ANDY MCNEES’ HANGOVER ERASER NO. 2
1 oz Fernet
.5 oz ginger syrup
.5 oz lemon juice
Dash Peychaud’s bitters
Dash Angostura bitters
Shake ingredients with ice & strain over new ice in a highball glass. Top with ginger beer.

Cin-cin!

FOR MORE HANGOVER REMEDIES, VISIT LUPECBOSTON.COM.

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, as originally published in the Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady

Despite a scathing New York Times review for its caloric content, eggnog is all the rage this time of year. That’s all well and good to be sure. Before eggnog was the Xmas drink de rigeur, there was Tom & Jerry, a beverage well worth reviving as the cold weather cometh.

Tom & Jerry is famously credited to legendary sporting man and bar star, Professor Jerry Thomas. In his rendition, the Professor invented the drink in 1847 for a man who’d originally requested an egg beaten up in sugar. He went on to spike it with booze and hot water: “It was the one thing I’d been dreaming of for months,” he told a reporter. “I named the drink after myself, kinder familiarly,” choosing Tom & Jerry after his two pet white mice “as Jeremiah P. Thomas would have sounded rather heavy, and that wouldn’t have done for a beverage.”

Numerous references to the drink from the 1820s, 30s, and 40s prove this story isn’t true, but it sure makes a colorful anecdote. What we do know about the Tom & Jerry is that it hails from New England and was trotted out at every bar worth its bourbon when the temperatures dropped. Traditionally batched in a china bowl and doled out in little “shaving mugs”, the frothy beverage warmed imbibers well into the spring months.

Eventually Tom & Jerry disappeared from all but the most traditional saloons. Let’s bring it back this holiday season, shall we?

TOM & JERRY (single serving)

1 egg

.5 oz simple syrup

1 oz dark rum

1 oz Cognac

Hot milk or hot water

Grated nutmeg for garnish

Separate the egg white from the egg yolk and beat them separately. Fold the beaten eggs together and place into a “shaving mug”, regular mug, or Irish coffee glass. Add the sugar or simple syrup, dark rum and brandy.

Cin-cin!

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, as published in the Weekly Dig.

The holiday season is in full swing, and the ladies of LUPEC are throwing a party! Raising funds for local women’s charities is a major tenet of our mission. We hope you’ll join us for our Holiday Punch Party this Monday at Trina’s Starlite Lounge to benefit On the Rise, a Cambridge-based nonprofit that supports the initiative and strength of women living in crisis or homelessness.

In addition to mixing, mingling and drinking, we’ll also be holding a clothing drive. Come with an article of women’s clothing (especially winter wear, bras and undergarments) and we’ll trade you for a free drink ticket. Proceeds from drink sales will also be donated to On the Rise.

We’ll serve punch, snacks and specialty cocktails all night thanks to Bols Genever, St-Germain and others. And we’ll be taking this time to welcome three new members to our little LUPEC coven—Boston Bullet, Harvey Wallbanger and Amber Dream.

Holiday attire is encouraged and can be interpreted however you like—bring out your ugly Christmas sweater, your Three Wise Men beard or your little black cocktail dress.

Mix up one of these as you dig through your closet.

HARVEY WALLBANGER

.75 oz Galliano L’Autentico

1.5 oz Vodka

4 oz fresh-squeezed orange juice

Mix vodka and orange juice in an ice-filled highball. Float Galliano on top. Garnish with orange wedges.

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Join us for a Holiday Punch Party on Monday, December 20th at Starlite Lounge to benefit On the Rise, a Cambridge-based non-profit that supports the initiative and strength of women living in crisis or homelessness.

In addition to the usual mixing, mingling, and drinking that our events offer, we’ll also be holding a clothing drive for the ladies served by On the Rise. An article of women’s clothing gets you a free drink ticket.

We’re seeking casual winter women’s clothing such as: winter coats, hats, gloves, and scarves as well as bras and undergarments of all sizes as there’s always a need for items like these. Proceeds from drink sales will also be donated to On the Rise, so you can still make a difference if all you have are pockets full of cash.

***Starlite will be accepting clothing donations all weekend long! You can drop items off Friday, December 17th – Monday, December 20th after 4pm.***

LUPEC Holiday Punch Party
Monday, December 20, 6 – 11 p.m.
Trina’s Starlite Lounge – Parlor Bar
3 Beacon St., Somerville, MA
Punch, snacks, and specialty cocktails will be served thanks to Bols Genever, St-Germain, Pierre Ferrand, Plantation Rum, Beefeater 24, Absolut, Chartreuse and more!

Holiday attire is encouraged and can be interpreted however you like: Santa Suit, ugly Christmas sweater, Three Wise Men beard, or little black cocktail dress.

We hope to see you there!

Cin-cin!

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston as originally published in the Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady

Did you know that ice is an American invention? Well, kind of. No one can claim ownership of frozen water, of course, but dropping a cube of it into beverages on a hot summer day was not such an easy luxury in the days before refrigeration. We can thank Frederic Tudor’s Yankee ingenuity for exporting the wonders of the ice-cold beverage to warmer regions of the world.

A well-to-do Bostonian, Tudor dropped out of school at Boston Latin at age 13, spurning a college education at Harvard to pursue fortune in his own inventions. As the story goes, Tudor discovered his calling at 17 while seeking a cold beverage in Cuba without success. He decided then and there to create a business out of “harvesting ice” from the local New England ponds that freeze so solidly each winter.

Tudor’s idea was at first met with ridicule but eventually grew into an empire. He sourced ice from familiar spots like Walden and Fresh Pond and shipped it around the world to Europe, the Caribbean, and even to the British East India Company in Calcutta. Tudor became known as Boston’s Ice King and died in 1864 a wealthy man. He even created an offshoot industry for Maine’s sawmills by insulating his precious cargo with the sawdust they’d previously thrown away.

Let’s raise a glass to Tudor as the holidays – and the many parties that ensue – approach. Several weeks ago, we LUPEC ladies got our hands on a special, modern invention that has satiated our high volume ice needs, the NewAir AI-100SS countertop ice maker from Air & Water. The kind folks in the marketing department offered us a chance to put this toy to the test. We’ve done so at several cocktail parties and found the machine to be true to its promise: it can make up to 35 pounds of ice per day and the first batch of ice cubes are complete in 15 minutes. Set-up and clean-up is delightfully facilement.

You may rarely have need for 35 pounds of ice, and equally little use for the urn you bought that offers coffee service for 45. But if you do enjoy entertaining, or simply enjoy being totally prepared every single time you do, this kitchen gadget may be just the thing for you.

Frederic Tudor would be impressed by how far we’ve come.

 

FROSTY DAWN

1 1/2 oz light rum

1 oz orange juice

1/2 oz falernum

1/4 oz maraschino liqueur

Shake in iced cocktail shaker. Strain into a chilled vintage cocktail glass.

Cin-cin!

FOR MORE GREAT COCKTAIL RECIPES VISIT LUPECBOSTON.COM.

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Recent thoughts from LUPEC Boston, as originally published in the Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady

As you well know, we love a good cocktail story. One of our all-time favorites is a tale about the Gibson. We’ve heard this myth bandied about by some of Boston’s most knowledgeable bar stars, and though we’ve never seen it substantiated, we’re happy to propagate it here. Fact or fiction? Who cares, we’re drinking.

The Gibson is essentially a martini garnished with cocktail onions. As the story goes, a savvy investment banker named Gibson in cahoots with his waiter and barman used the cocktail as a ploy during business negotiations. While meeting to discuss business, as his potential partners ordered a round of martinis, Gibson would announce: “I’d like a Gibson”. This cued his server to bring him nothing more than a glass of water garnished with cocktail onions. As you can imagine, after two or three rounds of drinks as negotiations wore on, Gibson had the upper hand. The servers always knew he’d closed the deal when he said: “Now sir, I’d like a martini.”

The Gibson Cocktail traces its roots to San Francisco – this much we know to be true. One story posits that it was created and popularized by artist Charles Dana Gibson, creator of the iconic Gibson Girls. Another states it was invented for wealthy financier and Bohemian Club member Walter D. K. Gibson sometime around 1898. Perhaps he was the Gibson who used the cocktail as a ploy to make him rich. Whomever can be credited, the drink was a hot ticket by 1904.

We’ve recently been enjoying the Gibson made with Nolet’s gin, a gorgeous gin that’s recently become available in Boston. Made with Turkish rose, white peach, raspberries, and a super secret proprietary blend of botanicals, Nolet’s is floral, fruity and delightfully elegant. The juniper element we love (but so many gin-phobes hate) is less pronounced than many of its contemporaries, making this a great gateway gin for the juniper-wary. Sample one of these at home, or at Eastern Standard where the house pickled onions are reason enough to order a Gibson.

THE GIBSON

Adapted from Imbibe! by David Wondrich

1.5 oz Nolet’s Finest Gin

1.5 oz dry vermouth

Stir ingredients with ice. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a cocktail onion.

Cin-cin!

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