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Archive for August, 2010

*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, in case you missed ‘em in this week’s Dig.

by Pink Lady

Ninety years ago this week the struggle for women’s suffrage in United States came to quiet end. At 8 a.m. that morning, Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby issued a proclamation that the 19th Amendment granting American women the right to vote in all public elections had officially become part of the Constitution.

The ceremony took place behind closed doors at Secretary Colby’s private residence “without ceremony of any kind,” according to the New York Times, “unaccompanied by the taking of movies or other pictures, despite the fact that the National Woman’s Party, or militant branch of the general suffrage movement, had been anxious to be represented by a delegation of women and to have the historic event filmed for public display and permanent record.” It was nevertheless monumental, a moment 72 years in the making and the culmination of a long and ceaseless campaign for American women and their male supporters.

Fifty-one years later, at the height of the Second Wave Women’s Movement, U.S. Congress designated August 26 to be “Women’s Equality Day”, both as a nod to women’s enfranchisement and to women’s continued efforts toward full equality. To paraphrase, the Joint Resolution was passed because “the women of the United States have been treated as second-class citizens and have not been entitled the full rights and privileges, public or private, legal or institutional, which are available to male citizens of the United States…the women of the United States have united to assure that these rights and privileges are available to all citizens equally regardless of sex” designating August 26, the anniversary date of the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, “as symbol of the continued fight for equal rights.”

Sounds like reason enough for us to raise a glass. The ladies of LUPEC Boston will be celebrating Women’s Equality Day as we do, with a party and cocktails, of course! We’ll team up with Bols Genever & St-Germain to host a cocktail party at the Franklin Southie on Thursday, August 26 from 9 p.m. – close, featuring $5 Women’s Lib-themed cocktails, cheap bar snacks, and general merry-making. We hope to see you there.

If you can’t make it by, why not sip on a Shaddock? It’s a delightfully delicious sip that contains both St-Germain and Bols and is simple to make at home. After all, it’s all equal parts.

THE SHADDOCK

.75 oz Bols Genever

.75 oz St-Germain

.75 oz Aperol

.75 oz fresh lemon juice

Shake with ice in a cocktail shaker. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Cin-cin!

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, originally published in the Weekly Dig.

by Pink Lady

Who doesn’t love an Aviation? This drink is a tremendous cocktail that has been thankfully resurrected in recent years by classic cocktail cognoscenti. The drink recipe was first published in How to Mix Drinks by Hugo Ensslin, the German-born head bartender at the Wallick House Hotel in Times Square. His was the last cocktail manual to hit bookshelves before Prohibition begat the great drought in America (and now recently available in reprinted form from Mud Puddle Books.) Many consider this drink one of the last great cocktails to be invented before the Noble Experiment.

The Aviation has made a glorious comeback in the past five or so years and graces the cocktail list of many a fine drinking establishment from coast to coast in 2010. The formula, however, is slightly different than the original mixture. You’ll typically find this drink made following the 1930 recipe that Harry Craddock ran in his tome, the Savoy Cocktail book, which features gin, lemon juice, and Maraschino liqueur.

The aforementioned recipe makes a fine drink, to be sure. But Ensslin’s pre-Prohibition recipe used two liqueurs to give this concoction wings: Maraschino and Crème Yvette. The latter has been unavailable in the states until very recently, making this classic potation’s name a mystery. Add a hint of the new-old violet-hued Crème Yvette recently released from Cooper Spirits (or Crème de Violette if you can’t find it), and the drink takes on a sky blue hue. Aviation was still very new back in 1916 and a hot topic, thus a perfect candidate for a cocktail name.

We suggest you sidle up to any bar that stocks Crème Yvette or Crème de Violette and sample the original recipe today, just because you can.

AVIATION

.75 oz lemon juice

1.5 oz dry gin

2 dashes Maraschino

2 dashes Crème Yvette

Shake with ice in a cocktail shaker and strain into your favorite vintage cocktail glass. Garnish with a Maraschino cherry.

Cin-cin!

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, in case you missed ‘em in this week’s Dig.

by Pink Lady + Bourbon Belle

Look at you, relaxing on the veranda or at the café in the early evening with a glass of something lightly sweet and lightly alcoholic. Stimulating your appetite with an aperitif? How civilized.

Aperitifs, or ‘aperitivos’ as Italians call them, were once a de rigeur start to a meal in France and Italy. These tipples were chosen for their appetite enhancing effects. As the members of LUPEC recently learned at the “Art of the Aperitif” seminar at Tales of the Cocktail (an annual convention for drink enthusiasts), many of the herbs and botanicals used in classic aperitif wines got their start in the pharmacy. Wormwood, the ingredient that gave vermouth its name (‘vermut’ in German), was once prescribed to cure stomach ailments; Gentian has similar medicinal purposes. Steeped in wine and fortified as vermouth, the bitter botanicals were believed to stimulate the palate, because the acid in the dry wine base kick-started salivation and, in turn, hunger.

Classic aperitif tipples include vermouth, Dubonnet, Kina Lillet (Lillet’s quinine-flavored, slightly bitter antecedent) and pastis or Absinthe. As it happens, all of these have potent and delicious application in cocktails. If it weren’t for vermouth, there would be no martini or Manhattan, of course. Without Absinthe or other anise liqueurs, how would you make a Sazerac? Aperitif-style beverages date back centuries in many cultures, but the practice of imbibing before gorging was particularly fashionable in Europe during the late 19th century, just as the cocktail was coming into its own.

As the cocktail enjoys a renaissance today, we think it’s only fair to give the aperitif another go. That’s why we’re planning to attend Brix by Night’s “Art of the Aperitif” class this Thursday. Tom Schlesinger-Guidelli will shake up cocktails made with modern classic liqueur St-Germain. Until then, we’ll conjure our appetites with one of these.

The Bohemian Cooler

1.5 oz. St. Germain

.75 oz. Old Overholt Rye

.75 oz. Lemon Juice.

Mount in a high ball, shake, add 2 oz. spicy ginger beer, add back ingredients and top with ice. No garnish.

Cin-cin!

The Art of the Aperitif will take place at Brix on Broad Thursday, August 12, 7 – 9 p.m. Tickets are $35 per person and include 5 cocktail tastes and traditional bar snacks. Space is limited. Call 617.542.2749, ext. 2 to make a reservation.

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*Recent ruminations from LUPEC Boston, originally published in the Dig.

by Pink Lady

LUPEC is fresh off the plane from Tales of the Cocktail, an annual convention for drink geeks in New Orleans, and after five straight days of imbibing, we sure are hungover. Back in the days before Prohibition, this situation called for one thing: a sour, a fizz, or really any style of morning brace up made with an egg.

Eggs are a contentious topic in many bars, which is why we were thrilled to attend the seminar entitled “The Egg-pire Strikes Back” last week. Work (or drink) in a craft cocktail bar long enough and you will inevitably hear a guest say: “Eggs in cocktails? Isn’t that dangerous? What about salmonella?”

Eggs have a long history as a cocktail ingredient. They were originally used as a substitute for milk in drinks and began to appear in recipes like the Morning Glory Fizz and the original recipe for the Sour in the 1880s.

Egg effectively works to bind the ingredients in the drink together, giving it a smooth, velvety texture. We’ve all been raised to fear salmonella, of course, but the bacteria takes about three to five weeks to develop, so using fresh eggs should keep you in a safety zone. It also targets the sick, the elderly and infants, most of whom shouldn’t be drinking anyway. And, in general, eggs have lower danger levels than lettuce.

Now, let’s get back to that morning brace up. People drank frequently in the days before Prohibition, which could of course lead to a bit of morning malaise. Before the Bloody Mary was even a twinkle in Pete Petiot’s eye, there was the Morning Glory Fizz. There are two ways to avoid a hangover: one is to never start drinking, the other is never stop. After stirring our souls and exhausting our livers at Tales of the Cocktail, I’m sure you know which one we’d choose.

Below, you’ll find Harry Johnson’s fizz recipe, about which he wrote: “The author respectfully recommends the above drink as an excellent one for a morning beverage, which will give a good appetite and quiet the nerves.” You heard the man. Bottoms up!

MORNING GLORY FIZZ

Harry Johnson’s recipe, adapted from Imbibe! by David Wondrich

0.75 tbsp sugar

0.5 oz lemon juice

0.25 oz lime juice

0.5 tsp absinthe dissolved well with a little water

egg white

2 oz Scotch whisky

Combine ingredients in a cocktail shaker and dry shake for a few seconds. Add ice and shake, then strain into a highball. Top with soda water.

CIN-CIN! LUPECBOSTON.COM

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